More RB Fields Converting to Artificial Turf

More RB Fields Converting to Artificial Turf

first_imgBy Rick MalwitzRED BANK – Red Bank Catholic High School Athletic Director Joe Montano will likely spend less time next spring peering out his windows, wondering whether to postpone a baseball or softball game due to rain.The grass and dirt – and often in the spring, the mud – playing fields at Count Basie Park are being replaced by artificial turf.“It will make my job a lot easier,” said Montano, whose job includes helping judge whether a field is ready for play.RBC head baseball coach Buddy Hausmann is also looking forward to the change. “I’ll be in bed and at midnight I’ll hear rain on the roof, and the rest of my night is shot,” he said. “What’s the field like? Can we play?”Based on the history of the performance of FieldTurf – the maker of the artificial turf to be installed here – such questions should not be a problem, said Borough Administrator Stanley Sickles. “You can have a downpour and 15 minutes later the field is ready to play,” he said.During the Borough Council meeting on Aug. 8, the governing body entered into an agreement with Tarkett Sports, manufacturer of FieldTurf. The council also amended a longstanding agreement with Red Bank Catholic High School, a primary user of the playing fields.The football field at Count Basie Park, also used by RBC, already has a FieldTurf surface. By next spring the artificial turf will be added to fields used for Little League baseball, high school baseball and softball, lacrosse, field hockey, and soccer.Five years ago a FieldTurf surface was installed at the baseball field at Rutgers. “It has performed above our expectations from the very beginning,” said Rutgers coach Fred Hill. “Our players really like it. We get a lot of consistent play from the surface. It is especially beneficial where the weather has many changes,” Hill added.The football field at Rutgers Stadium also has a FieldTurf surface that in 2004 replaced a grass playing field that was often difficult to maintain due to its proximity to the Raritan River.Seton Hall University and Kean University have baseball fields with artificial turf. East Brunswick High School is the lone school in Central New Jersey with an artificial turf field for baseball.Hausmann said some of his players have played on one of five artificial turf fields at Diamond Nation, a private facility in Flemington that hosts scores of games and tournaments.The only downside, said Hausmann, is the heat of the surface. “Last week we had a soccer camp (at the football fields) and kids were complaining their feet were on fire,” he said.Rain is not the only problem with natural grass fields, according to Hausmann. “In the beginning of the season the grass does not grow and the field can be rock hard. By the end of the season it has to be cut maybe twice a week.’’The new artificial turf is part of a plan to renovate Count Basie Park in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Renovations will include new walking paths, a concession stand, and restrooms. The estimated cost is between $1.8 million and $2.0 million.Funding will come from Monmouth County and state grants, a $500,000 contribution from Red Bank Catholic High School, and between $500,000 and $750,000 the borough will raise with a bond, according to Sickles.One grant of $60,000 is from Major League Baseball through its Baseball Tomorrow Fund. That grant will help fund the new playing field at the field currently used by Little League baseball and high school softball.The adjacent field will be a baseball field with Major League dimensions.Red Bank Catholic High School, according to Sickles, has been a “wonderful partner” in the maintenance of Count Basie Park.The school’s $500,000 contribution, which will be spread over 10 years, “was one of the things that made this possible,” Sickles said.The high school paid for the last renovation of the grass baseball field and other improvements, including the football scoreboard.“It is a great partnership,’’ Montano said.last_img read more

A Generation of Gems in Fair Haven

first_imgBy Michele J. KuhnFAIR HAVEN – Maureen Bay has been responsible for bringing a lot of sparkle and beauty to the borough for 30 years.Bay, the owner of Gem of An Idea at 740 River Road, is celebrating her 30th year in business and is proud of the designs, quality and trust-worthiness she has been able to offer her customers for three decades.Maureen Bay is celebrating 30 years in Fair Haven as the owner of Gem of An Idea.Bay began in the jewelry business working in a store in Shrewsbury. She and another employee decided to become partners in 1983 and they opened a store in another borough location. Bay amicably bought her partner out about six years later and moved the business to her present address.Her longevity has given her the pleasure of serving not only her original customers but also their children and now some of their grandchildren as well.“I’m now on the third generation of some of the families coming in to me,” Bay said. “I almost feel a little motherly or, maybe sentimental, about my clients. I’m resetting diamonds I sold to a young couple and now they are using that for their son or their daughter and they are having a baby … It’s kind of nice.“It’s making me feel old but it’s also making me feel that, if you can hold on to three generations of customers, you must be doing something right.”Bay has a passion for her business and the things she designs and sells. “I’ve always said this business is two things: trust and emotion. People have to trust you but buying jewelry … is an emotional thing … Most of it is for an occasion. It takes on added importance.”Bay feels that sense of responsibility to help customers buy that gift “whether it’s a father coming in with his son buying something for Mother’s Day for the first time” or someone purchasing something more extravagant. “You have to steer that client toward something that has to be just right, be the right price, be right for the person getting it, say everything they want it to say.”Bay’s business has chang­ed over the years. She says that when she and her partner founded the business, they were not as ambitious nor did they have a lot of money. “We did a lot of beaded jewelry,” she said. “We made a lot of our own things. I made a lot. I started out at the bench doing repairs. So my position with the business has moved from the bench area and creating to dealing more with the customers. Now I’m more behind-the-scenes again. I’m more into the operational part of the business.”While Bay is still creating exquisite pieces of jewelry, she has taken Gem of An Idea’s inventory over the years from its more humble start to more exclusive lines in gold and platinum and a wide variety of gemstones that represent her custom-designed pieces and various brands.Bay’s business philosophy is that she wants her customers “to feel comfortable … feel assured that they are dealing with someone who is honestly steering them in the right direction, someone who is offering them true value…I want them to feel confident and happy. I want them to walk out the door happy they came in and happy with whatever purchase or decision that they made.“I like to look a person in the eye and I like to be able to do the same thing 10 years after I sell them something,” she said.Bay estimates that within a mile of her store there are at least 15 jewelry stores, not to mention the various online retailers. “So why come in here?” she asks and then answers that she is “ offering something a little different, going out of our way for service … giving something to my customers that they can’t find elsewhere in terms of service, style, attention to them.“When someone walks in the door, they don’t remain anonymous for long,” she said proudly. “We go out of our way … whatever it takes.”Bay also is well known for her community spirit and has been actively involved in many Fair Haven occasions over the years. She was president of the Fair Haven Business Association for more than 20 years and has involved herself with different groups, including those fighting breast cancer, borough organizations, Clean Ocean Action, CPC Behavioral Healthcare and her alma mater, Monmouth University. “It’s important to give back,” she said. ”It’s also a way for people to meet me … and do something nice. If I have the ability to contribute, then I feel I have that obligation to support my community.”Bay came to the area from Massachusetts to attend Monmouth University in 1970. It was there she met her husband and graduated with degrees in fine arts and education. She taught school for a bit but decided that was not the direction she wanted to go and went into retail. She continued her education and is credentialed by the Gemological Institute of America.As someone surrounded by beautiful precious metals, fabulous pearls and glittering gemstones, Bay’s taste is “very eclectic.” Personally, she is drawn toward tourmaline. “It’s untreated, it comes in a variety of natural colors and it can be affordable or very expensive,” she said.She and her husband have enjoyed living in the area and riding their Harleys together. They have traveled extensively for more than 25 years around the East Coast on their motorcycles. They own five now. “It’s a good way to forget troubles of any sort,” she said.Though they now have a second home in North Carolina – found while on a motorcycle trip – and escape there whenever they can, Bay sees herself continuing with Gem of An Idea long past her 30 years in Fair Haven.“I like it here. I like the small town, close atmosphere. I like walking down the street and waving to people,” Bay said. “I feel very comfortable. I like the police. They watch me and make me feel safe … I like that people can park and walk into the store. It’s accessible and easy. It works for me.”last_img read more

Fair Haven Insurance Firm Grows Again

first_imgBy John BurtonFAIR HAVEN – A long operating independent insurance agency has continued growing with its acquisition of a Somerville agency.Boynton and Boynton, which has its main offices at 21 Cedar Ave., recently acquired another independent agency, the Genova firm, located in Somerville.It is the second acquisition and third expansion the firm has undertaken in the last two years.The state’s Department of Banking and Insurance’s Divi­sion of Insurance has approved the acquisition, which will operate as the Genova Insur­ance Agency, according to Boynton and Boynton.The Genova firm was established in 1967 by the father of Tom Genova, Anne Marie McDonough and Linda Casey, who now operate the location. The firm has specialized in personal insurance products, such as homeowners, auto, flood, as well as commercial and insurance coverage.The joining of the two will allow Boynton to provide additional depth of services for the firm’s clients, according to Jay Lynch, Boynton’s president and chief executive officer.“I am confident that the addition of the Boynton-Genova Agency will allow us to continue our growth in commercial and personal markets,” he said.“We’re always looking for opportunities to expand our presence,” said David Boyn­ton, operations manager.“We always liked the Somerville area and, when this opportunity came up, we wanted to do everything we could to make it happen,” David Lynch said. “It just made sense for both firms.”McDonough said she believed the two firms’ histories and efforts would complement each other. “I believe together we have a bright future,” she said.“It helps us out on our end by being part of a bigger agency. We now have access to more markets,” McDonough said.As for Boynton, she said, “They now have a presence in this county. So it’s a good thing all around.”Boynton and Boynton has had a long history in the Two River area, beginning in 1930. The firm’s staff has grown to nearly 93 in its three locations with the recent acquisition.Before this move, the company’s largest acquisition was a West Conshohocken, Pa. firm, located just outside Philadelphia, that specializes in medical malpractice, according to David Boynton.last_img read more

Red Bank Classic 5K Attracts 1,000 Runners

first_imgStory by Jenna Moldaver • Photos by Patrick Olivero |RED BANK – The streets of downtown Red Bank were alive and bustling early Saturday morning for the inaugural Red Bank Classic 5k, which drew about 1,000 runners and their supporters to the downtown.Among the participants were Gov. Phil Murphy and First Lady Tammy Murphy of Middletown, who surprised many in the crowd when they showed up in sneakers to run the race together.The event was hosted by the Red Bank Business Alliance and Red Bank RiverCenter. It raised about $20,000 for the Red Bank YMCA and the borough parks and recreation department.“A bunch of businesses and the Red Bank community got together and we decided we needed a community event like this and to bring a race back to town,” said organizer Angela Courtney, a member of the Business Alliance. “It just organically happened and it grew into this amazing event. We expected 500 people and got over a thousand.”While runners and their supporters gathered on Broad Street, local businesses showcased their products and services in Marine Park. Kitch Organic, Jersey Shore, Evolution Acupuncture and more set out pamphlets and samples under tents throughout the park. While the main action of the day took place a few blocks away, Marine Park was a site of relaxation, offering foot massages, paddle boarding and yoga for runners and community members to enjoy.A pre-race warmup offered by fitness professionals Mike Rodgers Jr. and Elizabeth Murphy guided the runners in stretches, offering motivational words as the race start neared.On each side of the throng of runners, supporters watched from sidewalks, taking pictures, cheering and holding signs like those of Red Bank residents Wallace and Messiah Woods, a father and son who made signs reading “Run Honey Run” and “My Mom is # Run.”Runners came in every variety: experienced, first-timers, solo and in groups. They ranged from under 14 to over 75. There was a special fun run for the younger set.The overall winners were Ean Jaffe, 17, of Holmdel (0:17:18.0), Kerry O’Brien, 34, of Belford (0:17:22.7), Anthony Scamardella, 19, of Red Bank (0:17:45.3), Sean Rath, 34, of Atlantic Highlands (0:18:20.3) and Abraham Calderon, 15, of South Amboy (0:18:36.2).The Murphys finished at 27:06, placing them in the top 25 percent of finishers.Of the 31 teams that competed, the top finishers were Sweetest Sins, Orangetheory Fitness, Shrewsbury First Assembly of God, Red Bank Eye and CrossFit TreeHouse II.More than 30 runners represented Red Bank Eye. The group of colleagues and customers donned team T-shirts with their enthusiasm. “Almost the entire office is out here,” said Eatontown resident Tom Sasso. All of the results have been posted and can be found at redbankclassic.com.The event brought together families, friends and the community at large, a feat Red Bank Mayor Pasquale Menna described as the primary goal of the race. He likened the lively event to his experience growing up with a particularly strong sense of community in Italy.“I was born and raised in Italy and I remember as a kid, everybody would meet in the piazza, the square, to eat or drink,” Menna said. “People would just walk around, meet their neighbors, talk, and it was a lively place. In a lot of respects, Red Bank is a little bit like that because we do have a very safe, active downtown and what you do see a lot is that it brings a focus on community.”Menna said this race, the first road race in Red Bank since the long-running George Sheehan Classic ended in 2015, is an important step in revitalizing this focus. He said he believes these types of events are essential in uniting a community.“All of a sudden, you realize that we’re really this small world and somebody who’s a different color, somebody who’s got a different faith, somebody who acts differently than you, they’re really just people,” he said. “They’re humans just like we are. It’s just a matter of mingling.”Throughout the morning, this community spirit pervaded moments both big and small: a woman extended her hand to her husband so they could cross the finish line together; a father pushed his infant son in a stroller for the entire 3.1 mile course; friends discussed the plight of uphill treks and unforgiving leg cramps as they reveled in post-race glory over bagels in Marine Park.From the volunteers handing out water bottles to the triumphant friends posing with medals at the finish line, Red Bank beamed with community pride.Road races may have taken a hiatus in the town, but community members tied up their laces once again without missing a step.This article first appeared in the June 21 – 28, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Voters Approve RBR Referendum

first_imgLITTLE SILVER – In a special school election held Dec. 11, voters in three boroughs approved a $17.3 million capital improvements plan for Red Bank Regional High School. The first proposal included a new roof ($4 million), renovation of existing facilities ($4.6 million) and the construction of 10 new classrooms ($7.1 million) for a price tag of $15.7 million in addition to state funding. Of the 2,186 votes cast on the first referendum question, 69 percent of the voters said yes, and 31 percent voted no. The second proposal centered on replacing Red Bank Regional’s grass football field with a multisport turf surface ($1.6 million) and upgrading the facility’s restrooms and concession stand ($730,000) for a cost of $2.3 million. Of the 2,170 votes cast on the second question. 59 percent voted yes and 40 percent voted no. Part of that presentation focused on the $4.9 million in state aid the school is expected to receive toward the plan. “I think you need to maintain the standards of the school,” Bill said. “The proposal for the artificial turf is a little bit of add-on, I think. But I can see how that ties into maintaining the infrastructure of the property.” Red Bank Regional Superintendent Louis B. Moore said the school community also reached more than 400 residents over that span, each time stressing that if the plan was not approved, the potential to cut school programming would increase and school taxes would surge. The rapid growth cut into enrollment at Red Bank Regional’s respected five academies by out-of-district tuition-paying students. Tuition revenue decreased from $4 million to $2.8 million during that time period. “The big takeaway for me, aside from the fact that both questions passed, is that both questions passed in all three towns,” said Red Bank Regional Board of Education member Frank A. Neary Jr. in a interview with The Two River Times Tuesday night. With these improvements, board member Neary said all the data and projections he and the board possess shows Red Bank Regional in a “good position for the foreseeable future.” “We have some wonderful academic programs. We also have some great specialty programs in our academies. These renovations are going to bring our facility up to speed. We have the programs, we have an incredible staff, now we’re going to have the facilities that will allow us to continue to grow. Red Bank Regional is on a roll,” Moore added. After 2023, costs are expected to drop to $12, $13 and $15 per year, respectively, school board officials said. All of their children have attended Red Bank Regional. Now their grandchildren are preparing to enter the high school, and the Hanrattys were both motivated to cast “yes” votes in Tuesday’s election. Moore said the focus of the improvement plan was always academics. According to unofficial results published Wednesday by the Monmouth County Clerk’s office, Red Bank Regional school district voters in Little Silver, Shrewsbury and Red Bank approved a $17.3 million plan for upgrades to the school’s academic and athletic facilities. The reason why, Moore said, is because enrollment is on an upward trend at the Ridge Road high school. Over the past four years, classroom space had become tight due to growing in-district enrollment. Each homeowner will have a different tax burden depending on the town they live in and the assessed value of their home. According to the school board, the average cost to Little Silver residents will be an additional $23 per year. It will be an average of $22 more in Red Bank and $24 more in Shrewsbury. Neary spent the last six months championing the improvements plan to more than 60 school district groups. Bill and Margie Hanratty have been Little Silver residents since 1978 when the U.S. Navy stationed Bill at Naval Weapons Station Earle in the Leonardo section of Middletown Township. “This was an overwhelming show of support from all three communities, and I think that’s because this is a reasonable plan that was well thought out,” Neary added. “We were clear about this from the beginning. The academic program came first,” said Moore, noting that Proposal No. 2 for the turf field could not pass if Proposal No. 1 failed. “We’ve supported Red Bank Regional for many years and we’d like it to maintain its reputation,” Margie added. “We’re not in perfect condition. And no- body knows what’s going to happen 10 or 20 years down the road, but we think for a good amount of time this is going to be a very reasonable plan. It’s not the perfect plan. But it’s a reasonable plan. And the administration and staff here can make it work,” Neary added. Residents were asked to weigh in on two questions in the voting booth.last_img read more

DiBella, Team B.C. drops a thriller in shootout at Canada Winter Games

first_imgElla Matteucci of Frutivale assisted on a goal by Nicole Medori Saxvik North Vancouver to give Team B.C. the lead. But Canada’s most western province could not hold off the late charge by Manitoba to secure the victory.Team B.C. advance to the contest by pounding Nova Scotia 8-2 Friday in relegation action. Karoline Huber of Kelowna scored twice to lead Team B.C.Team B.C. lost 4-0 to high-powered Quebec in quarter final action Thursday to drop into the relegation round.Team B.C., which includes Nelson Minor Hockey product Aimee DiBella, lost a heartbreaking 1-0 decision Wednesday to Team Saskatchewan to drop into 1-3 in Pool A play.

Team B.C. opened with a 4-0 loss to Alberta Sunday.

Team B.C. then lost 4-1 to Ontario Monday. DiBella had two minutes in penalties.

DiBella & Company finally got a win Tuesday, defeating Team Newfoundland & Labrador 4-0.

Along with DiBella on Team B.C. is Kootenay Wildcats teammate Daley Oddy of Cranbrook.

Matteucci played last season for the Cats but this year is playing in Wilcox, Sask., at the Notre Dame Hockey Academy.

During the first week of the Canada Winter Games, Team B.C. Men’s squad backed into the playoffs before reeling off a string of victories to claim the gold medal.

The Team B.C. squad include Luke Bertolucci of Montrose.sports@thenelsondaily.com The movers and shakers at B.C. Hockey made a ton of changes to improve the results of the female provincial team on the national scene. However, while the province did better its final resut the best the squad to manage was a sixth-place showing at the  Canada Winter Games in Halifax.Team B.C. fell 2-1 in a relegation thriller to Team Manitoba Saturday as the Canada Winter Games wrapped up.Team Alberta defeated Ontario 3-2 to claim the gold medal while Quebec edged Saskatchewan 4-3 to win the bronze.Team Manitoba scored with Team B.C. clinging to a 1-0 lead late in the game before capturing the contest in a shootout.last_img read more

Jolly simply too much for pack at Fall Svoboda Trail Running Race

first_img“The course was challenging with 2000 of climbing over the 13 kilometer loop, but everyone seamed to love it,” said race organizer Randy Richmond.”It was great to see some high school kids kicking but out there too, especially Linnea Sharelove who is only 14 years old.”The race is sponsored by Nelson’s Trail Running Series.Proceeds from the race go directly to improvements of the Nelson running trails.Next race is slated for later this month in Kaslo. The race is dubbed the Kaslo Suffer Fest.Race Results: Scott Jolly         1:23:58 Cail Spencer      1:26:56 Levi Smith        1:27:34 Jon Fancis         1:28:30 Sandy Boyd      1:29:45 Sasha Kabalis    1:30:19 Leanne Douglas 1:30:40 349 ?                   1:31:04 Scott Spencer     1:34:17 Jaime Frederick 1:34:44 Richard Klein     1:41:35 Nicola Everton   1:41:35 Greg Smith         1:46:00 Chris Stoich        1:46:20 Andy Daley        1:50:53 Graeme Marshall 1:50:53 Laurie Holton      1:52:51 Yogita Bouchard 1:53:00 Linnea Sharelove 2:05:22 Scott Jolly edged Cail Spencer by more than two minutes to capture the Fall Svoboda Trail Running Race Saturday.Jolly breezed over the 13 kilometer loop in a time of one hour, 23 minutes and 58 seconds.Spencer was next followed by Levi Smith in a time of 1:27.34.last_img read more

Leafs double Storm, run winning streak to five games

first_imgIn the third Nelson ran into penalty troubles allowing the Storm to cut the lead to 3-2 in the final two minutes.But a seeing-eye empty net goal by Carsen Willans ended any hopes of an amazing comeback.“Carsen’s goal was a relief because Kamloops was coming hard so that goal was big,”  confessed Soles, who faced 14 shots int the period.Austin Braid and Spencer Schoech scored for Kamloops.Saturday’s win completes a six-game in nine-day stretch for the Leafs, a time frame that saw Nelson win five of the games.“We’ve come together a lot more,” Soles explained when asked about the recent hot streak.“We started only .500 but lately we’ve been battling hard and we’re winning games because of it.”Nelson, finishing the month of October 8-3, host Beaver Valley Nitehawks Friday at 7 p.m. in the NDCC Arena. No doubt the Hawks will be looking for some payback after getting hammered by Nelson 10-3 last Tuesday.The Leafs then face Sicamous Eagles Sunday at 2:30 p.m.LEAF NOTES: Matthew Naka had an early night as the Leaf center got involved in a fight during the first period. . . . Defenceman Cole Arcuri missed is expected to be back in the lineup after recovering from an injury suffered earlier this month against Fernie. . . .New Leaf Kyler Wilkinson saw his first action for Nelson coming to the Heritage City franchise last week in a trade that saw Matti Jmaeff go to the Creston Thunder Cats. Brett Soles didn’t have a lot of work to do during the first 40 minutes of Saturday night’s Kootenay International Junior Hockey League game against the Kamloops Storm.Soles saved his best saves for the third period, stopping all but one shot to power the Leafs to a 4-2 decision over the Kamloops Storm at the NDCC Arena.The win, the fifth straight for the Green and White, allows Nelson to remain in top spot in the Neil Murdoch Division, four points in front of the idle Castlegar Rebels.Castlegar hosts Kamloops Sunday in the Sunflower City.“The boys kept it easy for me through the first two periods . . . I only had 13 shots,” Soles said from outside the Leafs dressing room. “In the third Kamloops came out hard and was battling but we managed only to allow them one goal in the third so it was good.”Nelson controlled most of the play through the first two periods, but ran into a hot netminder in former Leaf Marcus Beasley.Beasley, who was traded to Kamloops last season after failing to latch on with Prince George of the B.C. Hockey League, kept the game close as Nelson fired 30-plus shots at the Storm net through 40 minutes.Still Nelson was able to beat Beasley three times on goals by Jacob Boyczuk, Colton McCarthy and Kevin Bow to lead 3-1.last_img read more

Leafs blast Braves 7-2 to advance to Murdoch Final; Game one Friday at NDCC Arena

first_imgFor the first time in the entire Murdoch Division Semi Final against the Spokane Braves, the real Nelson Leafs stepped up.Travis Wellman scored three times and Kootenay Ice netminder Jason Mailhoit was solid between the pipes leading the Leafs to a convincing 7-2 shellacking of the Braves in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League playoff action Tuesday night in Spokane.Nelson wins the best-of-seven Murdoch Division Semi Final 4-2 and now hosts Beaver Valley Nitehawks in Game one of the divisional final Friday at 7 p.m. in the NDCC Arena.Game two is Saturday in Nelson.After failing to score in five periods of hockey, Nelson took a 2-1 lead after one period.The Leafs extended the lead to 5-1 after two before out scoring the Braves 2-1 in the third.Wellman, finishing the game with five points, snapped a three-game goaless streak with the trick Tuesday. Darnel St. Pierrie, Austin Seaman, Carsen Willans and Connor Tetlock also scored for the Leafs.Willans has four points while Linden Horswill also broke out of a point slump, finishing with three assists.Tyler Peltram and Tanner Stolz replied for Spokane which loss all three games at home.Nelson’s special teams also broked out of a slump, going 5-for-7 on the power play. At one point of the game, the Leafs were 4-for-4 with the man advantage.Mailhoit, back up for the Leafs throughout the series due to an injury to starter Brad Rebagliati, was thrust into the starting role when Nelson goalie Adam Maida injured a knee during Game five of the series Monday.Mailhoit, who played the season in the BC Major Midget League with the Ice, finished the game with 33 saves as Nelson out shot the Braves 42-36.Maida is out for the remainder playoffs.The status of Rebagliati is also questionable, forcing Leaf management to put in a call to Castlegar Rebels to see if rookie netminder Patrick Zubick was available.Zubick, who played two games for Castlegar during its series against Beaver Valley, lost both starts.The Leafs were once again without the services of leading scorer Jamie Vlanich, who suffered an upper body injury February 14 against Grand Forks.Status of Vlanich remains questionable for Friday’s opener.last_img read more

Ice let points slip away against Greater Vancouver Canadians

first_imgThe Kootenay Ice had a Greater Vancouver Canadians squad that was primed for allowing two points to slip away.However, the Canadians played just well enough to sweep the two game BC Hockey Major Midget League series this past weekend in Castlegar.Greater Van defeated the Ice 3-1 Saturday and 4-2 Sunday. Kootenay took a 1-0 lead in the opener on a goal by Aiden Browell of Fruitvale.However, Greater Van tied the game before the period ended then scored twice to secure the win in the third frame.Sunday, Kootenay twice let one-goal leads slip away before the Canadians scored three times in the third to steal the win.Kadrian Klimchuk and Shawn Campbell, both of Castlegar, scored in the first and second periods, respectively.Four different scorers replied for Greater Van.Burk Solomon of Castlegar and Jason Mailhiot of Trail were in goal for Kootenay.Kootenay, dropping to 4-20-4, returns to action this weekend with a pair of games against Okanagan Rockets Saturday, 5:45 p.m., and Sunday, 9 a.m., at the NDCC Arena.last_img read more