British Columbia Man Dies in Okanogan Co Motorcycle AccidentHit and Run Suspect

British Columbia Man Dies in Okanogan Co Motorcycle AccidentHit and Run Suspect

first_imgA 79-year-old British Columbia man’s dead after failing to negotiate a curve while riding a motorcycle in Okanogan County Saturday.Frank M. Hurney was traveling eastbound on SR 20 21 miles east of Mazama when the incident occurred.  The man, who was wearing a helmet, was pronounced dead at the scene.It’s not known if drugs or alcohol were involved.  State Patrol is investigating the cause of the accident.last_img

New report reveals current state of caregiving for Alzheimers disease

first_img 42 percent of caregivers use in-person support groups, online communities/forums 55 percent of caregivers say they are not getting adequate emotional support May 31 2018Nearly two-thirds of caregivers whose loved ones suffer from the debilitating effects of Alzheimer’s or related dementia say they would take medication to delay the onset of their own memory loss by even six months, if it were affordable and free of side effects. Sixty-four percent say they’ve already made healthy lifestyle modifications in an effort to prevent their own memory loss, making meaningful edits to their diet and exercise. However, only one-third of caregivers say they have been tested for the Alzheimer’s gene. These, and other, findings were revealed in a new report from Healthline Media, the fastest growing health information brand, reaching 39 million monthly users in the United States.The report, “State of Caregiving for Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementia 2018,” examines the current caregiving population, the challenges they face in caring for a loved one with the disease today and how advances in science and technology may affect caregiving roles in the future. The report included a survey of nearly 400 active caregivers across generations and in-depth interviews with medical experts and advocacy groups. The full report can be accessed at www.healthline.com/health/state-of-alzheimers.”Alzheimer’s disease is on the rise, and the landscape is evolving – the types of clinical trials, treatments, resources/support, and the accelerated need for more family caregivers to take on the intensive responsibility of care for loved ones,” said Diane Ty, Project Director of the Global Social Enterprise Initiative and AgingWell Hub at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business. “Healthline’s report helps prepare the modern patient and caregiver for the new state of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.”According to Healthline’s report, the intimate view of a loved one aging with Alzheimer’s or related dementia is prompting more caregivers (34 percent) to be genetically tested for the disease, something millennials (49 percent) are more proactive about than older generations (Gen Xers 36 percent, Boomers 17 percent.)Most caregivers report that a specific incident prompted a medical evaluation for their loved one (70 percent.) In almost half of all cases the incident was the last in a series, though more than one quarter of the cases were the first of its kind. Interestingly, millennial caregivers were more likely to report a first-time incident led to a medical evaluation (41 percent) compared to other caregiver groups (Boomers 21 percent; Gen Xers 18 percent.)Related StoriesNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellResearchers discover new therapeutic target for treatment of Alzheimer’s diseaseResearchers develop a more precise version of CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing systemKey Findings: CAREGIVER RESOURCES PATIENT 67 percent take up to one year to receive a specific diagnosis 41 percent had MCI (mild cognitive impairment) before an Alzheimer’s or related dementia diagnosis 75 percent of Alzheimer’s or related dementia patients remain home or in a private residence despite the disease’s progressioncenter_img CAREGIVER 71 percent of caregivers are female 72 percent of caregivers say their health has worsened since becoming caregivers 1 of 2 caregivers have had their career and/or finances impacted due to caregiving responsibilities “We know our readers – both patients and their caregivers – have individual health journeys and we always strive to understand their specific paths, and how our content can best support them,” said Tracy Stickler, Editor in Chief, Healthline. “The latest “State of…” report helps deepen our understanding of the evolving needs of the caregiver so we can create content and programs to better support them in making critical decisions.Healthline’s “State Of…” series examines consumer lifestyle data gathered by the website’s research team. “State of…” research results are paired with editorial content illustrating topics from the consumer’s perspective, highlighting credible, expert-informed insights to inform health decisions. The “State of…” series kicked off in July 2017 with the “State of Fertility,” followed by the “State of Care” and “State of Cancer.” “State of Caregiving for Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementia 2018” adds to the growing body of research in key disease states affecting Healthline’s readers – the modern healthcare consumer and their caregivers. Additional studies in this series will continue in 2018, examining other key disease states affecting Healthline’s readers.Source: https://www.healthline.com/last_img read more

Study Oxidative stress can be used against tumors to treat cancer

first_imgJun 21 2018Oxidative stress can help tumors thrive, but one way novel cancer treatments work is by pushing levels to the point where it instead helps them die, scientists report.Adoptive T cell therapy appears to reprogram the metabolism of tumor cells, increasing their level of reactive oxygen species, or ROS, and their destruction, says Dr. Gang Zhou, immunologist at the Georgia Cancer Center and Department of Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University.Scientists treated mice that had large, localized colorectal tumors with adoptive T cell therapy after preconditioning them with a chemotherapy drug known to help with the expansion and persistence of these infused T cells. The T cells are a patient’s own cells, but engineered to better fight cancer.The therapy appeared to deliver a deadly double-whammy to the cancer cells, says Zhou, corresponding author of the study in the journal Cell Metabolism.The scientists found the treatment interfered with production of glutathione, a natural antioxidant found in all cells, as it heightened production and accumulation of ROS inside tumor cells.Results included increased production by T cells of proinflammatory cytokines – including tumor necrosis factor alpha – which regulate many functions cancer needs to control like cell proliferation, differentiation and death.”We started by asking questions about how immunotherapy can change the metabolism of tumor cells. Our studies show tumor necrosis factor alpha can act directly on tumor cells and induce ROS inside them,” Zhou says.The bottom line of the metabolic changes include, for example, complete tumor regression in nearly all the tested mice.The scientists found similar effects – higher ROS levels correlated with high tumor cell death – when the therapy was used in models of breast cancer and lymphoma.Tumor necrosis factor alpha appears key to these desired results following adoptive T cell therapy, because when the scientists eliminated it from the equation, tumor cell death decreased dramatically.Scavenging ROS had a similar effect. When they gave the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine – a precursor to glutathione – it also hampered the curative effect of adoptive T cell therapy, they report.They also found that tumor necrosis factor alpha synergizes with chemotherapy to increase oxidative stress and cancer cell death. And, that giving pro-oxidants – drugs known to raise ROS levels – can somewhat replicate the tumor-killing benefit of adoptive T cell therapy. It’s known that these drugs may increase oxidative stress in cancer cells and push them toward death, or apoptosis, Zhou says.Related StoriesResearchers identify potential drug target for multiple cancer typesLiving with advanced breast cancerHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumors”Their baseline is already high and if you further disrupt their ability to deal with these free radicals, they will go toward apoptosis,” Zhou says.In fact, in an apparent failed attempt to fight off the higher ROS, the scientists found increased expression of several antioxidant genes in treated tumor cells.The significant, cancer-lethal ROS increases they found were limited to the tumor cells, not other nearby cell types.The scientists note that the direct killing of tumors by ROS they saw does not negate the possibility that tumor necrosis factor alpha also is working through its previously known method of killing off blood supplies to tumors.Antioxidant therapy in patients with active cancer has drawn mixed results, but most studies indicate that it worsens cancer, particularly in smokers, according to the National Cancer Institute. Preclinical studies in mice indicate the therapy promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Studies exploring the benefit of antioxidant therapy in preventing cancer have largely shown no benefit or harm, the NCI says.Tumors are known to impact T cells. In fact scientists have shown that the two can compete for nutrition and energy in the tumor microenvironment, remote sites tumors establish to successfully spread, the scientists write. It’s T cells that usually get short shrift in the struggle.Comparatively little focus has been on what T cells do to tumors, Zhou and his colleagues report. But better understanding of that impact should help improve immunotherapies, like adoptive T cell therapy, that seek to enable T cells to better target tumors.Adoptive T cell therapy is still under development for treatment of colorectal cancer. This therapeutic approach was already known to essentially poke holes in cancer cells to kill them.ROS are chemicals like peroxide and superoxide that are byproducts of necessary body functions like the use of oxygen and energy production by cell powerhouses called mitochondria. One reason cancer cells have naturally higher ROS levels is they have a high energy demand, Zhou says, constantly working to grow and spread.Some level of ROS also benefits our healthy cells, including cell proliferation and differentiation. But, too much is also deadly to normal cells, even damaging to DNA.Source: https://www.augusta.edu/mcg/last_img read more

New report estimates that about 36000 people die due to air pollution

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 28 2018A new report led by King’s and published by the government’s Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants (COMEAP) estimates that between 28,000 and 36,000 people die as a result of air pollution every year in the UK. This is a significant increase on their 2015 figure of about 29,000.The committee, chaired by Professor Frank Kelly, School of Population Health & Environmental Sciences, looked primarily at nitrogen dioxide and fine particulate pollution which are produced when petrol or other fuels are burnt. They highlighted that although this was the focus of their analysis, estimates of the number of deaths would inevitably include the effects of other pollutants that occur simultaneously such as ultrafine particles, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds.Related StoriesResearchers explore connection between sense of smell, pollution and neurological diseaseIncreased air pollution could reduce health benefits of living in walkable neighborhoodsResearch finds link between air pollution and coronary heart disease in ChinaProlonged exposure to these chemicals can exacerbate respiratory conditions and has been associated with a range of other health problems. Young children and older adults are particularly vulnerable.COMEAP’s report proposes that reducing the amount of traffic pollutants in the air we breathe* would save the UK population about 1.6 million life years over the next 106 years: equivalent to an increase of life expectancy at birth of eight days each.Professor Kelly, COMEAP Chairman and Director of King’s Environmental Research Group (ERG), said of the committee’s findings: Source:https://www.kcl.ac.uk/lsm/schools/population-health-and-environmental-sciences/newsrecords/air-pollution-could-cause-36000-deaths-a-year-in-the-uk.aspx ‘COMEAP’s latest report sought to gain a better understanding of the links between nitrogen dioxide and health and potentially provide a more complete overall picture of the health impact of air pollution.In London, the ERG has been highlighting the nitrogen dioxide problem for some time now and as increased control measures are introduced to deal with the issue we are undertaking studies to help monitor the benefit of decreased emissions and improved air quality on health.’last_img read more

RIKEN announces penalties related to stem cell fiasco

first_imgTOKYO—RIKEN, the network of nationally supported Japanese labs, today handed out disciplinary measures for those involved in the STAP stem cell scandal who remain under its authority.The actions result from nearly a year’s worth of investigations centered on an article and a letter published online in Nature on 29 January 2014 that described a new and extremely simple way of generating stem cells called stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency, or STAP. Nature retracted the papers last July. Even before the retraction, a RIKEN panel found lead author Haruko Obokata guilty of research misconduct for fabricated and falsified images. Investigators also concluded that several of Obokata’s supervisors bore a heavy responsibility for the mess because of their lax oversight. Obokata resigned in December after failing to reproduce her research results. Also in December, a RIKEN investigative team concluded that STAP cells never existed and that indications of pluripotency reported in experiments likely resulted from contamination of cell lines. Email Even though she has already resigned, RIKEN judged Obokata’s actions worthy of dismissal for cause. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Hitoshi Niwa, a co-author of the problematic papers and formerly a project leader, is also receiving a written reprimand. He remains on the staff.  For his role in the affair, Teruhiko Wakayama, a co-author who left RIKEN for a position at the University of Yamanashi before the papers were published, should have been suspended for cause, according to RIKEN. RIKEN also revoked his ongoing appointment as an associate researcher.Another co-author who oversaw Obokata’s work, Yoshiki Sasai, committed suicide last August.In a written statement also released today, Takeichi said that as head of CDB he bore “a heavy responsibility” for not catching in advance such unsuitable publications. He “solemnly accepted the punishment” and said he would work to promote research integrity. A RIKEN representative told ScienceInsider that there are a few bits of business related to the scandal still under investigation. One is whether RIKEN should return related research funds to the government. Another is whether to withdraw patent applications on the STAP technique filed jointly with Harvard University. Obokata initiated her work on STAP cells while a postdoc in the lab of Charles Vacanti, a tissue engineer at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School. RIKEN is also pursuing an action plan to prevent future lapses in research ethics throughout its system. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) According to a statement released today (in Japanese here), the following disciplinary measures were taken in accordance with RIKEN regulations:Masatoshi Takeichi, the former head of RIKEN’s Center for Developmental Biology (CDB), has received an official reprimand. He will voluntarily return 10% of 3 months’ worth of salary. Takeichi is still an adviser to CDB, which has been reorganized in the wake of the scandal.last_img read more

Researchers turn to volunteer readers to speed research on rare genetic disorder

first_img Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) In 2012, exome sequencing confirmed the world’s first NGLY1 patient—Bertrand Might, a 7-year-old boy in Salt Lake City. Last fall, Bertrand’s parents, Cristina and Matt Might, learned through a conference tweet that Andrew Su, a bioinformaticist at Scripps Research Institute in San Diego, California, was seeking lay volunteers for a curation project. Su and colleagues had previously shown that novices can curate reliably, earning about 7 cents per abstract. In that study, the researchers found curators through Mechanical Turk, a Web platform for harnessing human intelligence for things computers can’t do well. “The next step was to reduce that [cost] to zero, to see if we could get volunteers to help us,” Su says.The Mights were eager to contribute and got the NGLY1 community on board. “It was very clear they were interested and willing to attack this problem from different angles,” Su says. As a computer scientist at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Matt Might shares Su’s passion for managing and sharing data. The Mights have also seen the power of data sharing in a personal way. Matt’s essay about Bertrand’s 4-year journey to diagnosis turned out to be instrumental in identifying new NGLY1 patients.The National Institutes of Health (NIH) already spends millions of dollars hiring professional curators to do this sort of work. Now, the Scripps team aims to engage laypeople who are able and willing to do the same job—in small chunks at a time using their own computers—for free. Building the knowledge base requires humans to teach computers key concepts from curated articles; with modest online training, anyone who reads English can scan research papers for key terms—names of genes, proteins, diseases, and drugs—and use online marking tools to document relationships between them (for example, drug X treats disease Y). In an experiment completed a few months ago, the Scripps researchers found that although the average novice doesn’t curate as well as a person with a doctorate, groups of novices actually perform on par, or even slightly better, than a professional.Mark2Cure’s current project “is all about showing that the output of [volunteer] efforts is scientifically meaningful,” Su says. To ensure the results are applicable to research on NGLY1, the Mights helped connect the Scripps team with glycosylation expert Hudson Freeze. Freeze runs a lab at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, a mere 180 meters from Scripps. He and co-workers did some of the experiments that helped confirm that NGLY1 mutations caused Bertrand’s disease.Since then, Freeze’s lab has created cell lines using samples collected from 10 NGLY1 patients, and he hopes the crowdsourcing campaign will yield testable new hypotheses. For example, the curation effort could uncover information that suggests specific biomarkers or readouts researchers could test in the lab to gain insight into disease mechanisms—or, in the best case, lead to a cure for NGLY1 deficiency.Although today is Mark2Cure’s official launch, a small group of curators has already taken a first look at more than 100 abstracts. To achieve reasonable accuracy, each abstract needs to be annotated by at least 15 different lay curators, says Ginger Tsueng, Mark2Cure’s scientific outreach project manager. The team is hoping the citizen scientists will eventually curate thousands of articles selected for their potential relevance to NGLY1 deficiency. Participants rack up points for their efforts, up to 1000 per abstract, depending on how well they and other participants’ markings match. There is no “leaderboard” or prize, Su says. Citizen scientists seem plenty motivated “to contribute to something bigger than them.”Eileen Estenik, a part-time secretary in Mexico, Missouri, is one of the volunteer curators. She learned of Mark2Cure through the Mights after her 2-year-old son Benjamin was diagnosed with NGLY1 deficiency in November 2014. Before that, the boy was treated for seizures and had two rounds of chemotherapy for a liver tumor that eventually warranted a liver transplant last summer. “We’ve gone through a lot,” Estenik says. She got to work curating during Mark2Cure’s soft launch and so far has racked up more than 50,000 points. “We want our adorable little boy and all his buddies to have the best life we can give them,” Estenik says. “And if that means we have to fight through all those documents to help our doctors, so be it.”Scientists also think Mark2Cure could pay off. “At this time people can find useful information [within publications] much better than machines,” says Mike Cherry, a biologist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, who is involved with ClinGen, an NIH-funded curation project to build a database of genomic variants in precision medicine and research. “[Su] has devised an interesting and intriguing approach to triage the literature. I am sure the results will be very interesting.”center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Biomedical research is often slow and incremental, but it can take a leap when someone uncovers a hidden connection. For example, researchers might never have tested a hunch that fish oil eases symptoms of Raynaud syndrome, a circulatory disorder, if an information scientist hadn’t taken the time to painstakingly scour stacks of technical articles on the seemingly unrelated topics.It’s likely that other game-changing links lurk elsewhere in the biomedical literature. But with new papers getting published every 30 seconds, scientists are hard-pressed to find those needle-in-haystack connections. Today, one group of researchers is launching a crowdsourcing initiative to pave the way, by harnessing the efforts of lay volunteers who will scan papers for key terms to help create a powerful searchable database.This crowdsourcing curation campaign, dubbed Mark2Cure, is first reaching out to a particularly motivated crowd—the community of people affected by NGLY1 deficiency, a newly discovered genetic disorder. Researchers have diagnosed the disease—which is caused by defects in NGLY1, an enzyme that removes sugar molecules from proteins to ensure proper degradation—in about 35 people worldwide, but they believe some 1500 others may have it. The disorder has a bewildering array of symptoms that include liver problems, poor reflexes, an inability to produce tears, and sometimes seizures.last_img read more

Trumps first list of science priorities ignores climate—and departs from his own

first_img The guidance on energy says the goal of federal research investments should be “a consistent, long-term supply of lower-cost American energy.” That goal, it asserts, can be achieved through “a clean energy portfolio composed of fossil, nuclear, and renewable energy sources.”It should be no surprise that Trump’s list differs markedly from previous memos from the Barack Obama administration. Obama’s top five multiagency research priorities for his 2017 budget, for example, were global climate change, clean energy, Earth observations, advanced manufacturing, and innovation in the life sciences, biology, and neuroscience. Three items on that list—climate research, Earth observations, and advanced manufacturing—are completely absent from Trump’s priorities. So are biology-based initiatives pushed by Obama, including the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies Initiative and the Precision Medicine Initiative.ReactionThe initial reaction from some veteran federal budget watchers is bemusement. “Beyond the obvious differences with Obama’s approach, this guidance also doesn’t have a lot of similarities with President Trump’s own 2018 budget request,” says Matthew Hourihan, who analyzes federal research spending for AAAS in Washington, D.C. (which publishes ScienceInsider). Hourihan contrasted the memo’s focus on support for breakthrough military technologies, technology to prevent terror attacks, and helping older Americans remain healthy with the large cuts for those same areas that Trump has proposed.Hourihan says the budget guidance’s support for so-called “precommercial technology” in energy would suggest the administration would support for the Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, whose mission is to explore promising ideas too risky for industry. Yet Trump has asked Congress to shut down the $300 million agency, launched in 2009. (The Senate has balked at that idea.)Kei Koizumi, who headed OSTP’s research analysis shop during the Obama administration and is now at AAAS, says the memo is consistent with Trump’s emphasis in his 2018 budget on “defense first, security second, with the economy, energy, and health after that.” But he notes that it is silent on many important activities, including support for international collaborations and for training the next generation of scientists apart from improving the technical skills of the overall U.S. workforce. “There’s also no mention of space,” he notes, despite the recent relaunching of the National Space Council. In his view, “the memo shows that the administration doesn’t have science and technology priorities as such.” Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0) By Jeffrey MervisAug. 17, 2017 , 1:40 PM Matthew Hourihan, AAAS Beyond the obvious differences with Obama’s approach, this guidance also doesn’t have a lot of similarities with President Trump’s own 2018 budget request.  The memos typically don’t change much from year to year. But this is the first one from the new Trump administration. And it comes even as the White House lacks a presidential science adviser and OSTP director. It’s co-signed by OMB Director Mick Mulvaney and Michael Kratsios, a deputy assistant to the president, who since March has also been acting as OSTP’s head.The memo lists five priority areas (in this order): military superiority, security, prosperity, energy dominance, and health. Each is prefaced by the word “American” in keeping with the administration’s approach to branding issues.The phrase “basic research” appears only in connection with prosperity, the third target area. Agencies are told to “continue, and expand where necessary, efforts to focus on basic research” to promote “emerging technologies such as autonomous systems, biometrics, energy storage, gene editing, machine learning, and quantum computing.” Even then, however, agencies are directed to “reduce funding overlaps with industry in later-stage research, development, and deployment of [these] technologies.”In the health arena, the memo says “agencies should prioritize research focused on solutions for an aging population, as well as on combating drug addiction and other public health crises.” It also lists research “that will lead to more efficient and effective healthcare.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email President Donald Trump has translated his campaign promise to “make America great again” into his administration’s first blueprint for federal investment in science and technology.The White House today issued a four-page memo telling federal agencies that their research dollars should be focused on delivering short-term dividends in strengthening national defense and border security, the economy, and “energy dominance,” as well as improving public health. It says achieving those goals should not require additional spending, and that agencies should focus primarily on basic science, and then step aside as quickly as possible to let industry pursue any results that show commercial promise.The memo, written jointly by the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), is an annual reminder of the administration’s research priorities sent to agencies before they submit their next budget request. Those requests are due next month for the 2019 fiscal year that starts in October 2018. (Congress has yet to act on the budget for the 2018 fiscal year, which begins 1 October; most observers expect lawmakers to extend current spending levels well into the new fiscal year.) Trump’s first list of science priorities ignores climate—and departs from his own budget request Donald Trump Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Maleah Davis Mother Slammed For Instagram Posts

first_imgBREAKING: missing 4YO Maleah Davis was removed from her home in August by CPS. They tell us it was due to allegations of physical abuse, related to Maleah’s head injury, which required several brain surgeries. She was returned home in Feb. @abc13houston pic.twitter.com/jiAq1E6XVU— Shelley Childers (@shelleyabc13) May 6, 2019 The Associated Press reported that Houston authorities said Vence’s account has “changed several times.”Maleah was reportedly last seen wearing a pink bow in her hair with a light blue zip-up jacket, blue jeans and gray, white and pink sneakers. She has black hair and brown eyes and stands 3 feet tall, weighing 30 to 40 pounds.SEE ALSO:All The Ways Cops Are Still Trying To Cover Up LaQuan McDonald’s ExecutionOutrageous! Figurines Of White Cherub Crushing Head Of Black Angel Removed From Dollar StoreMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s Clothes Bowens actually responded with, “No not yet until I find out.”Her Instagram appears to now be deleted or private.Although has said she was “not sure” if there was abuse in her home, Texas Child Protective Services reportedly removed Maleah from Bowens’ home last year “due to allegations of physical abuse” that “required several surgeries,” ABC reporter Shelley Childers tweeted earlier this month. Brittany Bowens , Derion Vence , Maleah Davis Emantic "EJ" Fitzgerald Braford Jr. Jesse Jackson Demands ‘Justice Now’ At EJ Bradford’s Moving Funeral Ceremony AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMoreShare to EmailEmailEmail Four-year-old Maleah Davis has been missing for nearly three weeks and Derion Vence, her stepfather, is the sole “person of interest.” However, there were questions surrounding Maleah’s mother, Brittany Bowens, the latest of which stem from her social media habits. In particular, Bowens was slammed for keeping photos of Vence on her Instagram.See Also: A Timeline Of Dallas Cop Amber Guyger Killing Botham Jean In His Own HomeThere were photos and even a video of Vence next to Bowens’ five Instagram posts about Maleah, according to Fox 26. Users were outraged and left comments saying so. “You might want to delete Derion’s pictures off here, don’t you think?” on person wrote. “Please tell me why a man involved with the disappearance of Maleah won’t be deleted off your page,” another said. Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist More By NewsOne Staff A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ There has been speculation that Bowens may have something to do with her daughter’s disappearance. Vence’s father recently pointed fingers at Bowens and claimed his son was being set up.Vence originally told Sgt. Mark Holbrook of the Houston Police Department’s Homicide Division that he, Maleah and his two-year-old son were on their way to George Bush Intercontinental Airport Friday night to pick up Maleah’s mother, who was flying in from Massachusetts. Vence said he heard a “popping noise” and pulled over. He said a blue pickup truck pulled up behind his vehicle and two Hispanic males got out and hit him in the head. He said he lost consciousness and woke up at 6 p.m. the next day. He said Maleah was missing but his son was still there. Vence claimed he then walked to a hospital, received treatment and then reported Maleah as missing. Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more

Phoenix Cop Found Lying As JayZ Offers Help

first_img 35 Positive Images Of Black Dads That Shatter False Stereotypes On Father’s Day Aisha Harper , Dravion Ames , Jay Z , Phoenix Police Department Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice. White Tears! Former Meteorologist Files Lawsuit Claiming He Was Fired Because Of Diversity More By Megan Sims “You’re gonna fucking get shot!” the cop yells at one point.“I’m gonna put a fucking cap in your fucking head,” he said in another instance. SUBSCRIBE “My hands are up! My hands are up!” 22yo Dravon Ames says as a Phoenix police officer yells to “get your fucking hands up.” The same officer later says “You’re gonna fucking get shot!”Ames says the officers stopped him after his child walked out of a Dollar Store with a doll. pic.twitter.com/Nlkd7IXsyc— Meg O’Connor (@megoconnor13) June 12, 2019Meyer also pointed a gun at the group threatening to shoot them and demanding Harper put her baby on the hot ground despite the fact she could not walk. And all of this because a four-year-old allegedly took a 99 cent doll.On Saturday, ABC15 obtained a copy of the full police report, which was written by Meyer and found there were major differences in what was seen on the video and what was written in the report. The news outlet reported that Meyer made no mention of holding the family at gunpoint only writing that “Iesha was then removed from the vehicle.” He also did not talk about how he kicked Ames in the leg while he was handcuffed, which he only stated that Ames “began to tense his arms and turn back towards me. I made him spread his feet.” Another glaring omission was found when Meyer failed to mention that he ordered to put her child on the ground as he claimed Harper “refused to put the child down. She became loud, verbally abusive and refused our commands.” Another angle of the incident filmed by a different resident of the apartment complex where Ames and his pregnant fiancee were dropping off their kids with a babysitter show a Phoenix police officer trying to yank the child from the mother’s arms. pic.twitter.com/pTb07lZAXD— Meg O’Connor (@megoconnor13) June 12, 2019Following the massive outrage, Jay-Z‘s philanthropic organization within his entertainment company ROC Nation offered to provide legal support to Ames and Harper, who filed a claim on Thursday demanding $10 million from the city of Phoenix. According to AZCentral, ROC secured high-profile attorney Alex Spiro and is demanding the termination of the police officers involved and plan on filing against one of the officers for child neglect.“There is no place for that behavior in our world – let alone our justice system – and we are calling for the immediate termination of the police officers in question,” ROC Nation Managing Director of Philanthropy Dania Diaz said. “We are committed to supporting the family to ensure that justice is served.”Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams, who is a Black woman, released a video on the department’s Facebook page on Friday saying she was “disturbed by the language and actions of our officer.” Williams had to release another video prior to this incident after a new database outed racist Facebook posts made by police officers around the country, many of whom were with the Phoenix Police Department.center_img viral video of father speaking with baby son Viral video of a rogue police officer pointing a gun at a Black family in the presence of an infant and a young child in Phoenix, Arizona, angered countless people around the country. Newly released police documents show that the cop involved was not completely honest in his report on the incident. Now one hip-hop legend is lending a hand to the family in a major way as they begin the process of seeking justice. Morehouse Students Take To Social Media And Claim Sexual Harassment Complaints Were Ignored Jamaican Republican Who Is Running Against AOC Supported Her A Year Ago Witness video of the May 29 incident shows Phoenix police officer Christopher Meyer screaming threats and profanity toward a Black family in a van that contained Dravon Ames, 22, his pregnant fiance Aisha Harper, 24, their two young daughters. Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. A check of the database did not bring up results for Meyer, who is currently being reviewed by the Phoenix Police Department’s Professional Standards Bureau.SEE ALSO:Sudan Is Burning But People Don’t Care Because It’s Not A CathedralBlack Teacher Gives Students Haircuts For Graduationlast_img read more

US blames Iran for tanker attacks in Gulf of Oman Iran rejects

first_img“It is the assessment of the United States government that the Islamic Republic of Iran is responsible for the attacks that occurred in the Gulf of Oman today,” US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.Pompeo did not provide explicit evidence to back up the US assertion.“This assessment is based on intelligence, the weapons used, the level of expertise needed to execute the operation, recent similar Iranian attacks on shipping, and the fact that no proxy group operating in the area has the resources and proficiency to act with such a high degree of sophistication,” Pompeo said.Iran “categorically rejects the US unfounded claim with regard to 13 June oil tanker incidents and condemns it in the strongest possible terms,” the Iranian mission to the United Nations said in a statement on Thursday evening. US blames Iran for tanker attacks in Gulf of Oman, Iran rejects assertion An oil tanker is seen after it was attacked at the Gulf of Oman, June 13, 2019. (ISNA/Handout via Reuters)The United States blamed Iran for attacks on two oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman on Thursday that drove up oil prices and raised concerns about a new US-Iranian confrontation, but Tehran bluntly denied the allegation. LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? Related News The tanker attack will not affect Japanese energy supply, Japanese Industry Minister Hiroshige Seko said, although the ministry issued a warning to Japanese energy companies.Crude oil prices spiked more than 4% after the attacks near the entrance to the Strait of Hormuz, a crucial shipping artery for Saudi Arabia and other Gulf energy producers. Prices later settled about 2% higher. Brent crude was down by 0.4% at $61.06 a barrel in early Asia trading.Explained: How tanker attackers on a skinny waterway could affect oil pricesThe United States, which has accused Iran or its proxies of carrying out a May 12 attack on four tankers off the United Arab Emirates’ coast as well as May 14 drone strikes on two Saudi oil-pumping stations, squarely blamed Iran for Thursday’s attacks. It was not immediately clear what befell the Norwegian-owned Front Altair or the Japanese-owned Kokuka Courageous, which both experienced explosions, forcing crews to abandon ship and leave the vessels adrift in waters between Gulf Arab states and Iran.One source said the blast on the Front Altair, which caught fire and sent a huge plume of smoke into the air, may have been caused by a magnetic mine. The firm that chartered the Kokuka Courageous tanker said it was hit by a suspected torpedo, but a person with knowledge of the matter said torpedoes were not used.On Thursday night, US Central Command spokesman Bill Urban released a video of what the US military said was an Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corp Gashti Class patrol boat approaching the Kokuka Courageous “and was observed and recorded removing (an) unexploded limpet mine from the M/T Kokuka Courageous.” Best Of Express Iran said it would not respond to Trump’s overture, the substance of which was not made public. Advertising Hassan Rouhani says Iran ready to talk to US if sanctions lifted More Explained Advertising Kulbhushan Jadhav ‘guilty of crimes’, will proceed further as per law: Imran Khan Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach By Reuters |Dubai, Washington | Updated: June 14, 2019 12:21:29 pm Advertising Post Comment(s) Taking stock of monsoon rain With Iran deal teetering on brink, Europeans assess next steps UK says seized Iranian oil tanker could be released It accused the United States and its regional allies, which include Iranian rival Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, of “warmongering.” Iran called on “the international community to live up to its responsibilities in preventing the reckless and dangerous policies and practices of the US and its regional allies in heightening the tensions in the region.”US and European security officials as well as regional analysts cautioned against jumping to conclusions about who carried out the attacks, leaving open the possibility that Iranian proxies, or someone else entirely, might have been responsible.In London, British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said the UK was taking the matter “extremely seriously” and that if Iran was involved, “it is a deeply unwise escalation which poses a real danger to the prospects of peace and stability in the region.”‘Suspicious’ Tensions between Iran and the United States have risen since US President Donald Trump pulled out of a deal last year between Iran and global powers that aimed to curb Tehran’s nuclear ambitions in exchange for sanctions relief.Iran has repeatedly warned it would block the Strait of Hormuz if it cannot sell its oil because of US sanctions.Tensions have increased further since Trump acted at the beginning of May to force Iran’s oil customers to slash their imports to zero or face draconian US financial sanctions. Iran’s oil exports have dropped to around 400,000 barrels per day in May from 2.5 million bpd in April last year.Also in May, the Trump administration said it would send more troops to the Middle East, citing what it saw as a threat of potential attack by Iran.Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif described the tanker explosions as “suspicious” on Twitter and called for regional dialogue. In a later Twitter post, Zarif described the US allegations against Iran as part of “sabotage diplomacy.”Tehran has denied responsibility for the May 12 attacks.The crews of both ships struck on Thursday were picked up safely. The Bahrain-based US Navy Fifth Fleet said it had assisted the two tankers after receiving distress calls.UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres told a meeting of the Security Council on cooperation between the United Nations and the League of Arab States that the world could not afford “a major confrontation in the Gulf region”.The Security Council discussed the attacks behind closed doors on Thursday at the request of the United States.Kuwait’s UN ambassador, Mansour Al-Otaibi, president of the council for June, said after the meeting that all 15 council members had condemned the attacks.When asked if the United States had shown any evidence to support its accusation that Iran was responsible, Al-Otaibi told reporters: “We didn’t discuss any evidence.”Iran, US say war should be avoided Both Iran and the United States have said they want to avoid war.“Iran will never initiate a war but will give a crushing response to any aggression,” Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said on Wednesday.US Central Command said in a statement on Thursday evening that “we have no interest in engaging in a new conflict in the Middle East. We will defend our interests, but a war with Iran is not in our strategic interest, nor in the best interest of the international community.”Pompeo said US policy remained making economic and diplomatic efforts to bring Iran back to negotiations on a broader deal.The Iranian UN mission’s statement said: “It is ironic that the US who unlawfully withdrew from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action now calls Iran to come back to negotiations and diplomacy,” using the formal name of the 2015 nuclear accord.In abandoning the deal, Trump made clear he wanted Iran to curb not merely its nuclear work but its development of missiles and support for proxy forces in Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Yemen.Some regional analysts said they thought the attacks were likely to have been carried out by Iran and described them as a way for Tehran to try to acquire negotiating leverage and perhaps increase global pressure for US-Iran talks.“There is always the possibility that somebody is trying to blame the Iranians,” said Jon Alterman of Washington’s Center for Strategic and International Studies.“But there is the greater likelihood that this represents an effort to bolster Iranian diplomacy by creating a perceived international urgency to have the United States and Iran talk,” Alterman said.Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was visiting Tehran when Thursday’s attacks occurred, carrying a message for Iran from Trump. Abe, whose country was a big importer of Iranian oil until Trump ratcheted up sanctions, urged all sides not to let tensions increase.last_img read more

A new law was supposed to protect South Africans privacy It may

first_img Email By Linda NordlingFeb. 20, 2019 , 11:10 AM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A new law was supposed to protect South Africans’ privacy. It may block important research instead Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Ben Gilbert/Wellcome Trust To probe causes of cardiovascular disease, Michèle Ramsay of the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg takes volunteers’ personal history, blood, and urine and looks for genes or stressors that might help predict hypertension or stroke. She also asks volunteers for permission to share their data with other scientists and to make them available for future studies, in what’s called broad consent—a standard request from some big databases in Europe and the United States. A decade from now, her data and samples could help answer a host of new questions.But a new privacy law, scheduled to go into effect in 2020 and discussed by lawyers, ethicists, and researchers at a meeting here on 4–5 February, could upend such protocols in South Africa, a country whose varied population makes it a magnet for research on public health and human diversity. At a time when giant sample and data repositories called biobanks are transforming health research by allowing multiple researchers to ask different questions of the same data, South Africa’s rule could limit such secondary use of data and hamstring international collaborations. Where South Africa leads, other African countries might follow, adds Charles Rotimi, director of the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) Center for Research on Genomics and Global Health in Bethesda, Maryland. “It may set a precedent.”South Africa passed the Protection of Personal Information Act (POPIA) in 2013, but delayed enforcement to allow time to prepare and set up the required regulatory bodies. The law aims to protect South Africans from abuse of their personal data, and was modeled on an early draft of a privacy law in the European Union, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). But the GDPR was later modified to make exceptions for research—and the POPIA hasn’t been. Blood from a finger prick can be analyzed for viruses like HIV, but a new privacy rule may restrict research on such data in South Africa. The POPIA’s restrictive effects were only pointed out last year, when the Academy of Science of South Africa in Pretoria published a consensus study on the ethical implications of genomics. South Africa’s current, 2015 research guidelines allow broad consent. But the new law states that personal information—including genetic data—must be collected for a “specific, explicitly defined and lawful” purpose, and that data subjects need to be “aware of the purpose.”At the meeting here, experts said the law could be interpreted to prohibit researchers from reanalyzing biobank data to answer new questions. “If you don’t have broad consent, there’s no point having a biobank,” says Natalie Harriman, research integrity officer at Stellenbosch University, which houses several biobanks. Michael Pepper, a geneticist at the University of Pretoria, says it’s also unclear whether the rules would apply retroactively to data collected before the law came into force. “You’d have to go back and reconsent people, and if you can’t then you’d have to get rid of that sample,” which would be costly.The law doesn’t apply to data from which a person’s identity can’t be recovered, but this excludes genomic data by definition, because a person’s DNA sequence is unique. Social science researchers might also be barred from reusing photographs and personal narratives from ethnographic research, Harriman says. And sharing of sensitive health data such as HIV status might also fall foul of the law, because the data could technically be used to identify participants who have rare attributes.Jantina de Vries, a bioethicist at the University of Cape Town (UCT), says the law addresses real concerns. “We have to [balance] real risks for individuals and the potential collective benefit of research,” she says. She is a member of the ethics working group of the Human Heredity and Health in Africa project, an initiative funded by NIH and the Wellcome Trust in London to study African genomes. The law could affect her project, which plans to allow scientists to reanalyze DNA and samples, subject to rigorous ethics scrutiny. She and others also note that the law could clash with a trend for funders such as NIH and Wellcome, as well as journals including Science, to require that data be published and freely shared. Pepper, Harriman, and many others are pinning their hopes to a provision the POPIA makes for “codes of conduct” to explain how the law will be applied in special areas such as research. The participants of the meeting here are working on such a code. Institutions might also be able to apply for individual exemptions, or the law could be modified to make it more research-friendly. But changing the law might take years, says Melodie Labuschaigne, a law professor at the University of South Africa in Pretoria.Broad consent helps South Africa’s rich genetic heritage benefit humankind as a whole, Pepper says. “Preventing people from doing that work is a bit counterproductive,” he says. But Nicki Tiffin, a bioinformatician at UCT, says giving participants more control over their samples and data may not be a bad thing in a country where many hail from poor and vulnerable communities that may have been exploited in the past. By encouraging their participation, she says, the law may help research in the long run.*Correction, February 22, 11 a.m.: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated Jantina de Vries’s position with the Human Heredity and Health in Africa project.last_img read more

Child suicide bomber kills five at wedding in Afghanistan

first_img Afghan radio station closes down following Taliban threats Despite Afghan-Taliban peace talks, war on civilians continue Related News afghanistan news, afghanistan suicide bombing, afghanistan suicide bombing deaths, afghanistan bomb attack, suicide bombing, afghanistan wedding suicide bombing, taliban attack, is attack, Pachirwa Agham, Nangarhar province, world news, indian express An injured man receives treatment at the hospital, after a suicide attack in Jalalabad, Afghanistan. (REUTERS)A 13-year-old suicide bomber blew himself up at a wedding in eastern Afghanistan’s Nangarhar province, killing five people and injuring 11 others. Advertising By AP |Kabul | Published: July 12, 2019 1:46:28 pm Taliban car bomb kills at least 12 in attack on Afghan security compound Police official Fayz Mohammad Babarkhil said the child blew himself up early Friday at a wedding organized by Malik Toor, a commander of a pro-government militia.Toor died in the attack, and officials said he was the likely target of the bomber. The attack took place in Pachirwa Agham district of Nangarhar province.No one took responsibility for the attack, but both the Taliban and the Islamic State affiliate have a strong presence in eastern Afghanistan, and the IS group is headquartered in Nangarhar province. 1 Comment(s)last_img read more

Zombieload Fallout and 2 Other CPU Flaws Have Intel on the Hop

first_imgSpeculative execution is a technique used by most modern high-performance processors to improve performance by executing instructions before knowing they are required. Think of it as a good assistant anticipating your instructions and carrying them out in advance.Speculative execution reduces latency and extracts greater parallelism. Its results can be discarded if the instructions later fare ound to be unnecessary, although the predictions usually are correct, according to Intel.Speculative operations do not affect the processor’s architectural state, but they can impact the microarchitectural state, including information stored in translation lookaside buffers and caches.Side-channel methods work by measuring microarchitectural properties about a system. Side channels have no direct influence on the execution of a program, and they do not permit modification or deletion of data. Fixes Available Richard Adhikari has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2008. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, mobile technologies, CRM, databases, software development, mainframe and mid-range computing, and application development. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including Information Week and Computerworld. He is the author of two books on client/server technology. Email Richard. The high-tech industry once again is in a tizzy over flaws discovered in Intel CPUs. Four microarchitectural data sampling (MDS) vulnerabilities came to light on Tuesday.MDS is a sub-class of previously disclosed vulnerabilities that sample data leaked from small structures within the CPU using a locally executed speculative execution side channel.The four newly identified flaws:Zombieload, or RIDL — Microarchitectural Fill Buffer Data Sampling (MFBDS) – CVE-2018-12130 – Lets authenticated users use store buffers as an attack vector;Fallout — Microarchitectural Store Buffer Data Sampling (MSBDS) – CVE-2018-12126 – Lets authenticated users use store buffers as an attack vector;Microarchitectural Load Port Data Sampling (MLPDS) – CVE-2018-12127 – Lets authenticated users use load ports as an attack vector; andMicroarchitectural Data Sampling Uncacheable Memory (MDSUM) – CVE-2018-11091 – Lets authenticated users leverage uncacheable memory as an attack vector. “Every modern high-performance processor uses speculative execution,” Tirias’ Krewell said, “but not all speculative execution designs are the same. For example, AMD has not seen as many problems as Intel has — and to date, AMD believes it is not affected by MDS.”Intel CPUs have been hit by speculative execution vulnerabilities before. Three vulnerabilities discovered last summer impacted Intel’s software guard extensions (SGX) technology, its OS and system management mode (SMM), and its hypervisor software. Those flaws had high severity ratings.Speculative execution apparently opens the door to hard vulnerabilities that cannot be fixed outright but can be mitigated. That’s like incurring permanent damage from a broken leg and having to use a crutch for the rest of your life.The benefits of speculative execution — at least, the benefits of Intel’s implementation — have been called into question.”Speculative execution does allow CPUs to have higher performance, but these exploits are crippling the processors and reducing their performance,” Enderle observed.The patches may create other problems, he pointed out. “Having to install them is like your buying a 250HP car and reducing the engine’s output to 175HP because there are problems. At some point, customers will ask for their money back, because they’re not getting what they paid for.”Intel’s woes are “a huge boon for AMD,” Enderle said. “We were talking to Dell and other AMD customers, and they’re going to start using more AMD CPUs.” Intel and other high-tech companies affected — operating system vendors, virtual machine monitor (VMM) vendors, and other software developers — have issued patches for the MDS flaws.Intel’s microcode is available on GitHub.Microsoft has released software updates to help mitigate the vulnerabilities. Apple has released a security patch for macOS Mojave. Amazon’s AWS cloud service reportedly has been patched, and Google has patched Chromebooks.Intel recommends that end users and system administrators should check with their system manufacturers and system software vendors, and apply any available updates as soon as practical.Applying the Intel, OS and hypervisor software updates should have minimal impact on most PC client applications, Intel said, but performance or resource utilization may be affected on some data center workloads.Customers who have applied the updates but cannot guarantee their systems are running trusted software and who are using simultaneous multi-threading should consider how they use SMT for their particular workloads, Intel advised. They also should get guidance from their OS and VMM software providers, as well as consider the security threat model for their particular environment.Intel has not recommended disabling Intel HT (hyper-threading) because that step alone would not provide protection against MDS.MDS is addressed in hardware starting with select 8th- and 9th-generation Intel Core processors and the 2nd-generation Intel Xeon Scalable processor family. Future Intel processors will include hardware mitigations to address these vulnerabilities. About Speculative Execution Zombieload, Fallout and CVE-2018-12127 have a base score of 6.5, based on the industry standard Common Vulnerability Storing System (CVSS), which is a medium rating; CVE-2018-11091 has a base score of 3.8, which is low.The practical exploitation of MDS flaws is a very complex undertaking, according to Intel, and MDS by itself does not provide an attacker with a way to target specific data being leaked.Still, “if you get enough random data, you could run an analysis with AI and figure things out,” suggested Rob Enderle, principal analyst at the Enderle Group.”The regulations don’t say you’re OK if there’s a breach and the data stolen is random,” he told TechNewsWorld.Attacks could be launched through the use of malicious JavaScript in a Web page — a common enough attack technique — or from a co-located virtual machine in the cloud.Consumers needn’t worry, however, according to Kevin Krewell, principal analyst at Tirias Research.”From what I’ve read, MDS is a complex set of attacks, and is not something that would be used to target a typical consumer PC,” he told TechNewsWorld.”The MDS attack is an attack on virtual machine (hypervisor) architectures most associated with servers, not client PCs.”Intel said it was not aware of any reported real-world exploits of the four vulnerabilities so far. Fallout From the Flawslast_img read more

Shining new light on neuron firing

Source:https://news.stanford.edu/2018/12/12/watching-brain-cells-fire-real-time/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 14 2018Scientists have plenty of ways to watch as individual neurons in a brain fire, sending electrical signals from one to the next, but they all share a basic problem. Each method, whether it involves electrical probes, chemical agents or genetic modifications, is in some way more invasive than neuroscientists would like.That may soon change. As Stanford researchers report Dec. 12 in Light: Science and Applications, they have developed a way to watch brain cells send electrical signals using only light, a few lenses and other optical elements, and a fast video camera.The key to the new approach, said Daniel Palanker, a professor of ophthalmology and senior author on the new paper, is that when neurons fire electrical signals they subtly change shape. That nanometer-scale change can be measured using optical techniques.So far, Palanker, Tong Ling, a postdoctoral fellow and the lead author on the new paper, and colleagues have measured those miniscule shape changes in networks of neuron-like cells in a lab dish. They are now adapting their methods to study neurons in the brains of living animals. If that works out, it could lead to a more natural way to study at least some parts of the brain.”It’s all natural, no chemical markers, no electrodes, nothing. It’s just cells as they are,” said Palanker, who is a member of Stanford Bio-X and the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute.The shape of thingsA lot goes on when neurons fire. There is of course the electrical signal itself, which can be picked up by electrodes. There are also chemical changes, which can be detected using fluorescent molecules that light up when a neuron fires.And then there’s shape. Researchers first realized that neurons change shape by studying crayfish neurons more than 40 years ago. In 1977 a team of Stanford and UCSF researchers bounced a laser off a crayfish neuron as it fired and showed its width changed by roughly the thickness of a strand of human DNA.Yet translating those results into a way of optically observing neurons firing in human or other mammalian brains faced a number of challenges. For one thing, crayfish neurons are 10 to 100 times thicker than mammal neurons. For another, the technique that original group used – a simple form of what’s called interferometry – can only measure changes in a single point at a time, meaning it could be used to study only a small area of one cell at a time, rather than imaging the whole cell or even a network of neurons communicating with each other in the brain.Shining new light on neuron firingTo solve some of those problems, Ling, Palanker and colleagues first turned to a variation on standard interferometry called quantitative phase microscopy which allows researchers to map out entire microscopic landscapes – for example, the landscape of a network of cells arrayed on a glass plate. The technique is simple enough that it can be done by shining laser light through those cells, passing it through a few lenses, filters and other optical elements and filters, and recording the output with a camera. That image can then be processed to create a topographic map of the cells.Related StoriesNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionLing, Palanker and the team reasoned they could use the technique to measure how much neurons change shape when they fire. To test the idea, they grew a network of neuron-like cells on a glass plate and used a video camera to record what happened when the cells – actually kidney-derived cells modified to behave more like neurons – fired. By syncing the video with electrical recordings and averaging over several thousand examples, the team created a template that describes how cells move when they fire: over about four milliseconds, cell thickness increases by about three nanometers, a change of roughly one-hundredth of 1 percent. Once it reaches maximum thickness, the cell takes about another tenth of a second to shrink back down.Watching brain cells at workIn the initial phase of the experiment, the team needed electrodes to figure out when the cells fired. In the second phase, the team members showed they could use their template to search for and identify cell firing without relying on electrodes.Still, there are a number of steps to take before the team can make the method work in real brains. First, the team will need to make the technique work in actual neurons, as opposed to the neuron-like cells they’ve looked at so far. “Neurons are more finicky,” Palanker said, but the team has already started experimenting with them.A second challenge is that neurons in real brains aren’t arranged in a single layer on a glass plate, as were the cells Palanker’s lab studied. In particular, the team can’t shine lasers through the brain and expect to see much of anything come out the other side, let alone useful data. Fortunately, Palanker said, the techniques they used with transmitted light work similarly in reflected light, and most neurons reflect enough light that the approach should in theory work.There is one limitation that the team probably won’t be able to get around – since light doesn’t penetrate deep into the brain, the new method will only be able to probe the outer layers. Still, for projects that only need to study these layers, the technique could give researchers a cleaner, simpler way to study the brain.”Usually, invasive methods affect what cells do, hence making the measurements less reliable,” Palanker said. “Here you do nothing to the cells. You basically just watch them move.” read more

Novel biomarker links tumor progression to genome instability

first_img Source:https://www.aftau.org/weblog-medicine–health?&storyid4704=2430&ncs4704=3 Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 10 2019Our DNA is under constant attack. The delicate molecule that contains our genetic information is extremely vulnerable to everything from environmental agents, such as radiation, to the chemicals in the air we breathe and the food we eat. Genome instability can lead to genetic disorders, chronic diseases and a predisposition to cancer.A new Tel Aviv University study identifies elevated levels of a protein called ubiquilin-4 as a new biomarker for genome instability. The study finds that ubiquilin-4 takes part in defending the genome from DNA damage, but too much ubiquilin-4 is harmful. When the amount of ubiquilin-4 rises in tumor cells, the cells become more prone to genome instability, accelerating the tumor’s progression and making it resistant to commonly used cancer treatments.The study was led by Prof. Yossi Shiloh of the Department of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry at TAU’s Sackler School of Medicine, in close collaboration with Prof. Christian Reinhardt of University Hospital Cologne and University of Cologne. Research for the study was carried out in Tel Aviv by Dr. Ron Jachimowicz, now at the University Hospital of Cologne, and Dr. Yael Ziv and PhD student Bhavana Velpula, both of TAU. Dr. Dave Hoon of the John Wayne Cancer Institute in Santa Monica, CA, also contributed to the research. It was published on January 3, 2019, in Cell.”This novel biomarker provides new, critical information about the tumor stage and grade, as well as the patient’s chances of responding to treatment,” says Prof. Shiloh. “Tumors with high levels of ubiquilin-4 may be more resistant to radiation and some chemotherapies than those with normal levels of this protein. But the good news is that they may also respond better to other types of cancer therapy. Obviously, this is vital information for clinicians and patients.”The importance of maintaining genome stability and integrity has been demonstrated through the study of rare genetic disorders,” Prof. Shiloh continues. “But genome stability has now become a public health issue. There are so many proteins involved in responding to DNA damage, and behind every protein is a different gene. There are infinite ways in which a gene can mutate. Various combinations of these mutations may lead to chronic diseases and a predisposition to cancer, premature aging and other conditions. Genome stability is everyone’s problem.”Related StoriesLiving with advanced breast cancerTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerResearchers use AI to develop early gastric cancer endoscopic diagnosis systemAccording to the new research, the body’s DNA damage response is key to maintaining genome stability in the face of the constant onslaught of damaging agents. The response is composed of a broad, fine-tuned signaling network involving a standing army of proteins fully dedicated to this mission, as well as reserve proteins recruited temporarily to help resolve genome integrity.In 1995, the Shiloh lab discovered the gene encoding of one of the major sentries at the gate of genome stability — the protein ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). The finding was met with great fanfare. It concluded a long effort to identify the gene mutated in a severe genome instability syndrome, ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T).But ATM also plays a critical role in the body’s DNA damage response, mobilizing an extensive signaling network in response to tears in the long DNA molecule. It causes subtle chemical modifications in many proteins, which temporarily render them reserve proteins and recruits them away from their regular duties to carry out damage control.”We are constantly searching for new reserve proteins that respond to ATM’s call,” Prof. Shiloh says. “Our new study shows that, like many other proteins, ubiquilin-4 is modified by ATM, and for several hours it serves the ATM-governed system.”The researchers, in collaboration with Prof. Dagmar Wieczorek of the Institute of Human Genetics at Heinrich-Heine-University in Düsseldorf, also discovered that the deficiency of ubiquilin-4 alone can lead to yet another rare genome instability syndrome.”We hope our findings will provide a new tool for tumor classification, prognosis and treatment design,” Prof. Shiloh concludes. “The research highlights the broader implications of the importance of genome stability for our health.”last_img read more

As ER wait times grow more patients leave against medical advice

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 17 2019Emergency room patients increasingly leave California hospitals against medical advice, and experts say crowded ERs are likely to blame.About 352,000 California ER visits in 2017 ended when patients left after seeing a doctor but before their medical care was complete. That’s up by 57%, or 128,000 incidents, from 2012, according to data from the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development.Another 322,000 would-be patients left the emergency room without seeing a doctor, up from 315,000 such episodes in 2012.Several hospital administrators said overcrowding is a likely culprit for the trend. California emergency room trips grew by almost 20%, or 2.4 million, from 2012 to 2017.Moreover, ER wait times also increased for many during that time period: In 2017, the median ER wait time for patients before admission as inpatients to California hospitals was 336 minutes — or more than 5½ hours. That is up 15 minutes from 2012, according to the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The median wait time for those discharged without admission to the hospital dropped 12 minutes over that period, but still clocked in at more than 2½ hours in 2017.California wait times remain higher than the national average. In 2017, the median length of a stay in the ER before inpatient admission nationwide was 80 minutes shorter than the median stay in California. Four states — Maryland, New York, New Jersey and Delaware — had even longer median wait times.The growth in patients leaving California ERs prematurely was faster than the growth in overall ER encounters. About 2.4% of ER trips in 2017 ended with patients leaving the ER against medical advice or abruptly discontinuing care after seeing a doctor, compared with 1.8% in 2012.”Most patients are sick but not critically ill,” said Dr. Steven Polevoi, medical director of the emergency department at UCSF Helen Diller Medical Center at Parnassus Heights. “Emergency care doesn’t equal fast care all of the time.”When a patient leaves the ER after seeing a doctor but before the doctor clears them to leave, the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development classifies that encounter as “leaving against medical advice or discontinued care.” The definition includes encounters in which a doctor carefully explains the risks to the patient and has the patient sign a form, but also instances in which the patient simply discontinues care and bolts out the door.Patients leaving the emergency room too soon “are deliberately putting themselves at more risk for morbidity and even mortality,” Polevoi said — a point echoed by other physicians.Dr. Veronica Vasquez-Montez, emergency room medical director at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles, said she sometimes finds herself having “tough conversations” with sick patients intent on leaving the ER, often citing pressing responsibilities.”If you die from this,” she tells them, “you are good to no one you are caring for.”One of her recent patients was at high risk for a major stroke but insisted he needed to leave the ER to take care of his pet.”Guess what he came back for? A major stroke,” said Vasquez-Montez, also a clinical assistant professor at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine.Related StoriesMedicare Advantage overbills taxpayers by billions a year as feds struggle to stop itIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyRaw meat can act as reservoir for bacteria associated with hospital infectionsCompared with all ER patients, those leaving against medical advice were more likely to be men; people ages 20 to 39; and uninsured or on Medi-Cal, the government insurance program for the poor, state figures show. They were also more likely to complain primarily of non-specific symptoms such as chest pain or a cough.Fresno, Shasta, Yuba, Kern, San Bernardino and Tulare counties had the highest proportion of ER encounters in 2017 that ended with patients leaving against medical advice or abruptly discontinuing care. Each of those counties recorded more than 4% of ER patients leaving too soon, state figures show.From 2012 to 2017, the number of emergency room encounters in Fresno County increased by almost 95,000, or 37%. At Fresno’s Community Regional Medical Center, about 9% of ER encounters ended with a patient leaving too soon, more than three times the statewide rate.Community Regional Medical Center is one of the busiest hospitals in the state. It recently instituted a “Provider at Triage” program that puts caregivers in the lobby area with patients, said Dr. Jeffrey Thomas, the hospital’s chief medical and quality officer. The hospital’s internal data now show fewer than 2% of patients leaving against medical advice or abruptly discontinuing care.”When patients bring themselves into the ED, they are seen in about 5 minutes by a qualified registered nurse and, on average, are seen by a provider within 30 minutes of arrival,” Thomas said in a statement.When a sick patient is about to leave the emergency room, doctors should determine why he or she wants to go, make sure the patient is capable of making a sound decision, involve friends and family, explain the course of treatment and, if nothing works, arrange for speedy follow-up care, said Dr. Jay Brenner, emergency department medical director at Upstate University Hospital-Community Campus in New York and co-author of several studies about patients leaving against medical advice.”When someone requests to leave,” Brenner said, “it needs to be a priority that ranks just below a cardiac arrest.”Phillip Reese is a data reporting specialist and an assistant professor of journalism at California State University-Sacramento.This KHN story first published on California Healthline, a service of the California Health Care Foundation. This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

Longterm followup of childhood cancer survivors is essential to maintain bone health

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jul 3 2019Advances in the treatment of children and adolescents with cancer have led to substantial improvements in survival, with a 5-year survival rate of childhood cancer close to 80%.However, treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation can have long-term effects on bone health, potentially impacting on the attainment of peak bone mass, predisposing to premature onset of low bone mineral density, or causing other bone-related side-effects, such as impairment of bone quality or avascular necrosis of bone.A new publication by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) Cancer and Bone Working Group reviews the latest knowledge in this area of clinical research and provides succinct recommendations for essential long-term follow-up of bone health in childhood cancer survivors. The review ‘Bone health in childhood cancer: review of the literature and recommendations for the management of bone health in childhood cancer survivors’ aims to help clinicians define specific groups at higher risk of long-term bone complications, identify unrecognized long-term adverse effects, and ultimately improve patient care. It includes a concise diagnostic-therapeutic algorithm which outlines a clinical pathway to aid physicians in the long-term care of their patients.Professor Maria-Luisa Brandi, Head of the Bone Metabolic Diseases Unit, Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Italy, and lead author of the study, states: “In children and adolescents treated for cancer, the attainment of peak bone mass, which is a fundamental factor affecting bone mass in adulthood, can be negatively affected. Lower bone mineral density and microarchitectural deterioration can persist during adulthood, thereby increasing fracture risk. That is why the bone health of children and adolescents with a cancer history should be carefully monitored, and patients should be informed of possible late complications of their previous medical treatment.”Related StoriesEngineered stem cells offer new treatment for metastatic bone cancerUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedAs well as cancer treatments such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and stem-cell transplantation, factors which contribute to bone mass impairment in childhood cancer survivors include an inadequate diet (especially calcium and vitamin D deficiency); prolonged treatments with glucocorticoids; hormone alterations involving growth hormone and/or gonadal hormones; reduced or absent physical activity, and inflammation and altered secretion of cytokines due to cancer cells.The review also points to areas where there are substantial knowledge gaps and identifies the need for further research to clarify whether improving bone health in childhood cancer survivors differs from the management of bone disorders in the general population.Professor René Rizzoli, Chair of the IOF Cancer and Bone Working Group, added: Cancer treatments in youth have a multifactorial impact on bone fragility and a core objective, both during treatment and once the patient is in remission or cured, is to reduce the impact on future adult bone health. This requires long-term follow up, involving effective transition from pediatric to adult care, as well as good communication between pediatric oncology and primary care. As clinicians we must work together to help to maintain and protect our young patients’ skeletal health.” Source:International Osteoporosis FoundationJournal reference:Brandi, M.L. et al. (2019) Bone health in childhood cancer: review of the literature and recommendations for the management of bone health in childhood cancer survivors. Annals of Oncology. doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdz120.last_img read more

Metabolic enzyme tied to obesity and fatty liver disease

first_img“If you are exposed to chemicals that are metabolized by Cyp2b or inhibitors of Cyp2b, this might mean that you are not metabolizing something else in the body that is important,” William Baldwin, professor and graduate program coordinator in the College of Science’s department of biological sciences, explained. “In turn, maybe your likelihood of retaining white adipose tissue increases and therefore your likelihood of being obese increases,” he added.Related StoriesResearch team receives federal grant to study obesity in children with spina bifidaNovel program in England’s third largest city helps reduce childhood obesityLiver fat biomarker levels linked with metabolic health benefits of exercise, study findsOn the contrary, female mice that are Cyp2b-null didn’t manifest increased body weight or white adipose tissue. When the researchers checked the blood samples of the mice, they found increased leptin, cholesterol, and ketosis in male Cyp2b-null mice, compared to wildtype mice.Furthermore, the liver triglycerides in male Cyp2b-null mice were higher than their counterparts, hinting a role of Cyp2b in fatty acid metabolism, despite having the same diet. Worse, there was a suggestive result of fatty liver disease progression is present in normal diet-fed Cyp2b-null male rats like the one in high-fat diet fed wildtype counterpart. As a result, the researchers found the role of Cyp2b in lipid homeostasis.This means that the male Cyp2b-null mice had heightened fatty liver disease even with a normal diet.“Cyp2b must be signaling something and telling the fat to go someplace, indicating that Cyp2b has dual roles: metabolizing toxicants and chemicals in the environment and pharmaceuticals, but it is also involved in the metabolism of lipids and probably involved in signaling to tell us how to distribute fat,” Baldwin added.“Females did not show as demonstrative changes in liver health, and significantly fewer changes in gene expression, as well as gene expression associated with liver disease,” the researchers said in the study.“Overall our data indicate that the repression or inhibition of CYP2B may exacerbate metabolic disorders and cause obesity by perturbing fatty acid metabolism, especially in males,” they concluded.The study is part of a three-year, $362,000 grant the lead author, Baldwin, received from the National Institutes of Health.Obesity by the numbersIn 2016 alone, there were more than 1.9 billion adults in the world who are overweight. Of these people, more than 650 million had obesity. The global prevalence of obesity almost tripled from 1975 to 2016.In the United States, 93.3 million adults are obese in 2015 to 2016. Obesity may lead to various complications, some of which are life-threatening. These include type 2 diabetes, some types of cancer, heart disease, and stroke, among others.The rate of obesity is continuously increasing; hence, studies are focused on finding causative factors that can provide insight into obesity. Also, determining these causes may help in the formulation of treatments and preventive measures to curb the worldwide epidemic.What is a fatty liver disease?Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a condition wherein excessive amounts of fat is stored in the liver. The fat buildup is not caused by alcohol intake, instead, it’s linked to being overweight or obese. Journal reference:Melissa M Heintz, Ramiya Kumar, Meredith M Rutledge, William S. Baldwin, Cyp2b-null male mice are susceptible to diet-induced obesity and perturbations in lipid homeostasis, The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnutbio.2019.05.004. (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0955286318312385) Clemson University graduate student Melissa Heintz and professor William Baldwin recently published their collaborative research in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. Image Credit: Pete Martin / College of Science By Angela Betsaida B. Laguipo, BSNJul 11 2019A type of metabolic enzyme, which aids detoxification, has been linked to obesity and fatty liver disease, a new study found.A team of researchers at the Clemson University found that Cyp2b gene, which metabolizes endo and xenobiotics, may be linked to age-onset obesity and dyslipidemia, especially in males. The researchers conducted the study, which was published in the Journal of Biochemistry, to determine if the exposure to specific chemicals enhances obesity. Specifically, they wanted to identify the role of Cyp2b in unsaturated fatty acid metabolism, regardless of diet. Some chemicals could inhibit the gene, an event shown in the experiment with Cyp2b-null mice.The team used a laboratory mouse model to explore the role of Cyp2b gene in obesity. It’s an enzyme involved in metabolism, particularly the chemical detoxification in the body. The researchers treated wildtype and Cyp2b-bull mice with a normal or high-fat diet for 10 weeks.After, they determined the molecular and metabolic changes that happened. They found that the male high-fat-diet-fed Cy2pb-null mice weigh 15 percent more than the wildtype mice given a high-fat diet. The greater weight has been linked to an increase in white adipose tissue.There were many potential implications for human health.last_img read more

Amazon workers in Spain plan first ever strike

Explore further The union says workers in Amazon’s San Fernando de Henares centre, where they prepare packages for clients in Spain and Europe, have not had a wage increase since 2016 Amazon hit by first strike in Germany Citation: Amazon workers in Spain plan first ever strike (2018, March 13) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-amazon-workers-spain.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2018 AFP “We have announced a strike for the first time in Amazon Spain but it will only take place in the logistics centre of San Fernando de Henares, near Madrid, the biggest in Spain and the first created in the country” in 2012, said Ana Berceruelo of the CCOO union.The strike is planned for March 21 and 22.Berceruelo said the online retail giant wanted to increase salaries below the inflation rate, and reduce allowances for night work as well as pay for overtime.CCOO says the workers in the San Fernando de Henares centre, where they prepare packages for clients in Spain and Europe, have not had a wage increase since 2016.Berceruelo said 1,100 Amazon employees, and 900 people employed by temping companies, work on site.She said that the average salary was around 20,000 to 21,000 euros ($24,800 to $26,000) a year against 19,000 euros in the logistics sector.”We will continue to maintain direct dialogue with our associates and guarantee the best working conditions, a competitive pay package, a great work atmosphere and professional opportunities,” the company said in a statement.Amazon has grown from a humble beginning as an online bookseller to a colossus of the internet whose founder Jeff Bezos is now the world’s richest man. More than 1,000 Amazon workers in Spain are planning to go on strike next week against a planned drop in allowances and overtime, a first in the country, a union said Tuesday. read more

Preview Shadow streaming service may succeed where OnLive others failed

OnLive game streaming service to start in June Despite the promise of high-end PC gaming at the fraction of the price, services such as Nvidia’s GeForce Now and PlayStation Now haven’t caught fire. Worse yet, OnLive, the pioneer in the field, went kaput, casting doubt on the viability of the technology.Part of the reason is that all these services are closed systems. Players who buy into them are restricted to playing on certain devices. Shadow takes a different approach. Blade opens up its streaming service to virtually any device and lets players treat it like any standard PC. The big difference is that instead of running on local hardware, the service lets players run their games remotely off a Xeon processor with 12 GB of DDR4 Ram, an Nvidia graphics card that’s the equivalent of a GTX 1080 and 256 GB of hard drive space.With that power, they can run nearly any game at max settings. It can even run hardware intensive applications such as Adobe Photoshop. The Shadow service essentially turns nearly any computer into a $2,000 gaming rig. On smartphones and tablets, it uses the screen like a monitor and players can use a Bluetooth controller to make the game perform like something on a console.Shadow could run the full “Fortnite” without compromises on an iPhone before “Fortnite” widely came out as an app on the App store. What’s more important is that the service acts like a PC because it is a PC except that the system runs on a data center. This freedom lets players install Steam and run mods for games that they own on the service. They can add Battle.net and play “Overwatch” on a tablet.Another important element about Shadow is that Blade dedicates computing resources for every player. That means there shouldn’t be a drop off in clarity or performance and the service can only grow as far as its hardware. In France where the company launched, it limited the number of people who could initially access the service until they had enough computers.That means the only questions facing Shadow is lag and stability. The company says it has built an end-to-end system that’s streamlined so that it works with minimal input delay. It functions so well that professional “Street Fighter” player Olivier “Luffy” Hay uses the service. I can attest that the service works flawlessly from the limited time I used it, but there are reports that actual use is less than stellar.I played “Rise of the Tomb Raider” on max settings on a laptop and continued the game on phone a few minutes later. Shadow started the game where I left off and the screen in both cases looked impressive without many noticeable artifacting. In fact, I did another test where I had two identical laptops next to each other, and I couldn’t tell the difference until one ran Adobe Photoshop faster than the other. (The faster one was using Shadow.)The service has plenty of potential and could be a reasonable alternative to a gaming rig. Players don’t have to worry about upgrading it. They can run nearly any peripheral, application or game. The only thing that gives me pause is the size of the hard drive. At 256 GB of storage, that’s not a lot for players with massive game collections. At this point, Blade says it has no plans to let players upgrade their 256GB of space so they’ll have to delete games on the service to make room for more.The service costs $35 per month with a locked-in annual subscription. It is costlier if players pay for it each month or in three-month segments. At the moment, Shadow is only available in California and select areas of Europe. ©2018 The Mercury News (San Jose, Calif.) Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. Citation: Preview: Shadow streaming service may succeed where OnLive, others failed (2018, April 20) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-preview-shadow-streaming-onlive.html Explore further The biggest obstacle for Blade’s Shadow service is the past. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more