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Sacred words

first_imgMarilynne Robinson speaks a sacred language.In her Noble Lecture at the Memorial Church Sanctuary on Monday evening, the literary giant enchanted her audience with “The Divine,” a statement against the “invidious judgment” of Western modernity on mythic elements in sacred narrative.“We stigmatize what we feel we must reject,” she said to the crowd that filled the pews despite the ill-timed April snowstorm. “I argue that we have reduced in a way the scale of human experience.”Robinson, who was awarded the National Humanities Medal in 2012, is beloved for her four novels, “Housekeeping,” “Gilead,” “Home,” and “Lila.” “Gilead,” the story of a small-town pastor in Iowa, earned the author the 2005 Pulitzer Prize. She has also won acclaim for her essay collections, including “The Givenness of Things” (2015), about faith and humanity.“It is the absence of divinity that dehumanizes nature,” she told the crowd. “There’s nothing paradoxical in this thought. Myth brings scale to the narratives that stir the human imagination. Properly speaking we are the stuff of myth, and yet we have no language to address the scale of the experience we have, not only as dwellers in a cosmos, but also as creatures whose thoughts naturally inhabit the vastness of myth, creation to doomsday, who see our galaxy as a path across the heavens, who spin out new tales of the impossible even while we sleep.”Robinson joined the long list of leaders and thinkers whom the Divinity School’s William Belden Noble Lectures, established in 1898 by Noble’s widow, have brought to Harvard. She was introduced by Professor Matthew Potts, who called her a “profoundly moral writer.”“She causes us to wonder,” he added, before turning over the lectern to Robinson.Brushing her long white hair from her face, the 72-year-old author took note of the gilded eagle affixed to the front of the lectern before commencing with her lecture. “I have a larger and more glorious bird than Bernie Sanders did,” she said, prompting roars of laughter.In her talk, Robinson drew from a variety of literary sources, quoting William Wordsworth and Emily Dickinson (“The brain is wider than the sky”) and expounding on the pluralistic God (the Hebrew Elohim) in the Old Testament.After the lecture, Mary Sue Daoud, a graduate student at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, stood in a line that wrapped around the church, waiting for Robinson to sign her copy of “The Givennness of Things.”“It’s exciting as a devout Christian myself to see someone leave their mark on the academic world without compromising their faith,” she said.Casper ter Kuile, who is studying jointly at Harvard Divinity School and Harvard Kennedy School, found in Robinson’s theme a link with his examination of fitness organizations that use religious language to connect with exercise enthusiasts.“If you go to SoulCycle, they ask, ‘Who are you riding for?’ It’s about more than yourself. It’s the greater something, about transformation,” he said. “There is something more important than our everyday life.”last_img read more

Saint Mary’s honors tradition with Service Fair

first_imgTags: Non-profit, OSCE, Rebekah DeLine, service fair Saint Mary’s College has dedicated itself to upholding its tradition to service. The College’s commitment to service will manifest in a service fair Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. in the atrium of the Student Center.The Service Fair was partially organized by Rebecca DeLine, the director of the Office for Civic and Social Engagement (OSCE).“We hope to connect students to [a] local service organization in the community so that they might find a service opportunity that interests them,” DeLine said in an email.DeLine said she hopes students create a relationship with organizations that will be lasting and that fosters commitment and “that students might commit to a semester of regular engagement with one of our local non-profits.”The fair will feature a number of non-profits that work in diverse fields.“There will be 33 non-profits represented in addition to two OCSE-sponsored opportunities,” DeLine said. “I think that there should be something for everyone.”DeLine provided some examples of non-profits that students interested in working in the South Bend community might find compelling.“I don’t think I’m allowed to play favorites, but I will say that we have a wide range of non-profits from those serving youth in after-school programs to those working particularly with the Latinx population to those that work with individuals who are dying,” she said.The Service Fair is the realization of the work of the OSCE. The organization spent months planning the event in order to connect students to their communities, DeLine said.“We started by contacting our community partners shortly after Thanksgiving, but the planning actually began a bit before then as we reserved the space and worked with Campus and Community Events to determine how many non-profits we could host,” she said.DeLine said she recognizes the benefits of students participating in service, but also recognizes the stressors of school and other extra-curricular activities can cause the time commitment of regular service impossible.“I think engaging with the community is a good thing in and of itself, but I am also realistic that students are very busy and may not have as much time to help at a non-profit if they aren’t receiving something in return,” she said. “So real benefits I know that students will receive are work experience, networking.”The Service Fair is a part of the celebrations of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s life, but it also takes place in the 175th year of Saint Mary’s. DeLine said the Service Fair connects with these two events.“The Sisters of the Holy Cross have long demonstrated a commitment to living and serving alongside the community they are a part of and they did this through first developing authentic and personal relationships with the communities where they lived,“ she said.  “The service fair is one way that we can help students get to know the community and to find ways to respond to the needs that are brought forth.”DeLine said she is looking forward to a lot about the Service Fair, but the thing that she is looking forward to the most is the community and the excitement it produces.DeLine said she is looking forward to the Service Fair and hopes that it will bring “a lot of great energy and hopefully a lot of wonderful connections between students and the community.”last_img read more

Cynthia Nixon-Helmed Rasheeda Speaking, Begins Previews Off-Broadway

first_imgThe New York premiere of Rasheeda Speaking begins previews on January 27. Directed by Cynthia Nixon, the New Group production stars Oscar winner Dianne Wiest, Tony winner Tonya Pinkins, Patricia Conolly and Darren Goldstein. Opening night is set for February 11 at off-Broadway’s Romulus Linney Courtyard Theatre at the Pershing Square Signature Center. Written by Joel Drake Johnson, Rasheeda Speaking explores unspoken tensions between Ileen (Wiest) and Jaclyn (Pinkins), two front desk workers who find themselves in a power struggle with the doctor (Goldstein) for whom they work. Conolly plays Rose, a patient who visits the office. Show Closed This production ended its run on March 22, 2015 View Comments Rasheeda Speaking This production features set design by Allen Moyer, costumes by Toni-Leslie James, lighting design by Jennifer Tipton and sound design and original music by David Van Tieghem. Related Showslast_img read more

Food Security Summit

first_imgWhen it comes to the goal of feeding the world’s growing population, the only certainty is that it will take a multipronged approach.To help facilitate the collaboration that is going to be necessary, faculty members at the University of Georgia recently convened food security experts from across the nation to discuss how UGA scientists and students could build a more food-secure world. The UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ (CAES) inaugural Global Food Security Summit brought together the leaders of United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA) with researchers and policy makers to discuss priorities in the realms of food production and food protection.“The things that we do matter because, by all estimates, by 2050 there will be 9 billion people on the planet,” CAES Dean and Director Sam Pardue told the crowd. “When I was a child there were 3 billion. Things have changed dramatically, and we are going to need more food. We’ll need 30% more food by 2030; 2030 is not very far away. This is a task that we take very seriously.”The summit was unique because it looked at the issues facing farmers, researchers and nongovernmental organizations in one conversation, as one system. Everyone benefits from a food-secure world, said American Farm Bureau Federation President Zippy Duvall.“Our Farm Bureaus are interested in this discussion because we know how important it is that all people have adequate food,” Duvall told the crowd. “We know that as people are fed, they get up and develop their lives, they become closer to the middle class, they have more money to spend, and they can buy the products that we sell. So waters that rise lift all boats — it would lift them up and lift us up too — and that’s what life really is all about.”A panel on scientific barriers to increasing food production included participants such as CAES Professor Wayne Parrott of the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Fort Valley State University Department of Biology Chair George Mbata, USDA NIFA Director Scott Angle, Rep. Sanford Bishop, Rep. Austin Scott and Director of the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut Dave Hoisington.Their discussion on logistic, economic and social barriers to technology adoption by farmers, and strategies for ensuring appropriate technologies is available to farmers around the world.A second panel focused on food distribution, trade and nutrition. The group, made up of foods and nutrition Professor Alex Anderson of the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS); Samara Sterling, research director at The Peanut Institute; Professor Lynn Bailey, head of the Department of Foods and Nutrition in FACS; Tom Schaetzel, nutrition director for CARE; Ellen McCullough, assistant professor in the UGA Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics; and Maura Barry Boyle, senior deputy assistant administrator for USAID’s Bureau for Food Security.Their discussion focused on the cultural factors that lead to inequitable food distribution. It also focused on the failures of trade and subsidy policies, and the research needed to craft policies that ensure food security around the world. To find out more about how CAES contributes to the global effort for food security, visit caes.uga.edu.To see some of the comments made at the summit, visit www.youtube.com.last_img read more

A Critical Factor in Finding Technology for Your Business

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York In addition to my role as president of LISTnet, I run a software and technology consulting company. As a consultant, part of what I do is help people find the right software to run and grow their businesses. There are a lot of things to consider.What technology is the software built on? How scalable is it? Is there good documentation and training? How does this fit into the rest of the technology the company is running? Will it be running in the cloud or on site? How will it be managed and updated?Those and other requirements are crucial to evaluate. There is, however, another very important consideration. It’s easy to fall in love with the technology and be wowed by the latest and greatest features. But the most critical factor is the people that will be doing the work.It’s important when looking for technology solutions to get to know the actual people behind it. Are they reliable and trustworthy? Will they be there for you if things go wrong? Who are the people running the company and what’s their background? Will you be able to reach an executive or developer if necessary?One of the biggest benefits of LISTnet is getting to know people that can help grow your business. When you need something, you have a network of people to reach out to. Also, these people all have a bunch of connections themselves and can connect you to reliable vendors they work with.Of course, not everyone is part of LISTnet, yet, so you should get to know vendors in other ways. The best way, if possible, is to meet in person. Have lunch with them. Don’t just talk about the business stuff, but get to know them. If in person is not possible, spend some time talking by phone or Skype.Ask to talk to other people in the company. Talk to the people that wrote the software and the people that will be supporting it. Talk to a few of their customers. Talk until you have a good sense of the people and factor that into your buying decision. Also, a good relationship flows in both directions, make sure you follow up on any promises you make.The right tech helps a business serve their customers better and grow. But it’s people that create and manage the technology. Those people will be the ones that make the difference between a solution that works and one that creates problems instead of solving them. Take some time to get know the people you will be depending on.last_img read more

Household debt front and centre for RBA and regulators in coming year

first_imgHousehold debt levels will continue to be a strong focus of regulators in the coming year, according to RBA.RBA Governor Philip Lowe expects to see better growth out the Australian economy in the coming financial year, but household debt levels will be a strong focus.Summing up the year in the RBA’s 2017 annual report out this week, Mr Lowe said “over the year, the Board has paid close attention to developments in household balance sheets and housing markets.”More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this homeless than 1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investorless than 1 hour ago“The coming year is likely to see better growth in the Australian economy,” he said. RBA Governor Philip Lowe expects to see better growth in the coming year. Picture: Patrick Hamilton/Economic Society of Australia“The Reserve Bank Board adjusted the cash rate target once in the year in review, lowering it to 1.5 per cent in August 2016. This followed inflation outcomes earlier that year that were noticeably lower than expected. Since then the Board has held the cash rate steady, with the stimulatory setting of monetary policy helping the economy adjust to the winding down of the mining investment boom.”He said RBA wanted “an average rate of inflation over time of between 2 and 3 per cent in a way that promotes the public interest and does not add to medium-term financial stability risks”.He said the way that RBA worked with other financial regulators through the year was “a valuable aspect of Australia’s regulatory arrangements and one that does not exist in all countries”.last_img read more

Birth app a hope for Ethiopian women

first_imgIn Ethiopia, where almost nine in 10 women give birth at home with little or no support, a mobile phone app is coming to the rescue.The “Safe Delivery App”, created by the Danish development organisation the Maternity Foundation, provides simplified instructions and animated films to deal with emergencies, be it haemorrhaging, birth complications, resuscitating newborns or infections.“Midwives may have skills and knowledge,” said Mesfin Wondafrash, the Maternity Foundation’s Programme Manager in the Horn of Africa state.“But they may not apply the right procedures when complications arise — even simple complications.”At the touch of a button, the app can give crucial guidelines to birth attendants, who are often traditionally educated and may lack training in up-to-date procedures that could save lives.The programme is proving vital in rural areas, where the only help many mothers get is from family members or a local woman. Described as an emergency training tool, the app is available in English and local languages.It can be pre-installed on a phone so it works even without a network connection.Officially, 85 per cent of Ethiopian babies are born at home. The hospital is often seen as an option only when major complications arise.“Women wait at home and if a complication occurs, it may be too late to access care,” Mesfin said.Testing started last year in the small town of Gimbie, 450 kilometres west of Addis Ababa. A total 78 phones with the app were given to midwives.“After a year, the capacity of the app users to manage bleeding rose from 20 to 60 per cent, and new born resuscitation, from 30 to 70 percent,” Mesfin added.last_img read more

Area Basketball Scores (1-11)

first_imgArea Basketball ScoresThursday  (1-11)Boys ScoresGreensburg  69     Batesville  61East Central  56     Franklin County  41Girls ScoresSouth Dearborn  44     Oldenburg  40South Ripley  58     Rising Sun  32Greensburg  60     Columbus East  50SW Shelby  52     North Decatur  43Waldron  64     South DEcatur  30SW Hanover  50     Switz. County  43Brownstown Central  42     Hauser  22Crothersville  75     Edinburgh  45last_img

Georginio Wijnaldum: Newcastle deserved criticism

first_img Press Association The Magpies found themselves with their backs against the wall after humbling defeats by Leicester and Crystal Palace sent them back into the bottom three after they thought they had turned a corner. However on Sunday they summoned up a performance of real character to beat high-flying Liverpool 2-0 at St James’ Park and rekindle belief that head coach Steve McClaren can lead them away from trouble. Georginio Wijnaldum has admitted Newcastle deserved the criticism which came their way as they plummeted back into the Barclays Premier League relegation zone. Wijnaldum told nufcTV: “Of course it’s hard, criticism is always hard to get, but a lot of the criticism, to my mind, was right because we didn’t have good performances. “You can lose games, but the way we were losing games was really bad because the performance was not good and we didn’t do it as a team. “I don’t want to say that everyone wasn’t giving their all – I think everyone did – but we didn’t do it as a team. If everyone plays their own game, then it is difficult to win the game. “But we have learnt from that and today, we did it differently. We fought as a team and fought to get the points, and that’s why it’s a big win.” Newcastle’s improvement could hardly have been better timed with McClaren facing rumours that he had two games in which to save his job, although it is understood there is no appetite within the boardroom to dispense with the services of a man who has only been in the post for six months. His buzzword in the run-up to the game had been “confidence”, a trait which had proved sadly lacking in the two previous outings, but after a nervy start, Newcastle found a coherence and a stomach for the fight before eventually producing the quality they needed to get the job done. They got their reward with 29 minutes gone when Wijnaldum collected Moussa Sissoko’s cross and worked his way into position before firing home via a deflection off defender Martin Skrtel. Asked if it was his goal rather than an own goal, the Holland international replied: “Yes, of course, because I shot on goal.” The Magpies enjoyed a further slice of good fortune when an offside flag harshly ruled out an Alberto Moreno strike, and they took full advantage when Sissoko and Wijnaldum combined once again in injury time for the latter to seal the win with a deft chip. If Tyneside was all smiles, there was frustration for Liverpool boss Jurgen Klopp and his team as they were unable to rediscover the cutting edge which has served them so well in recent weeks. It was just a second defeat in 12 attempts under the German in what was the second of seven fixtures in a congested month. However, full-back Nathaniel Clyne admits they have to put it behind them quickly if they are to achieve their goals for the remainder of the campaign. He told the club’s official website, www.liverpoolfc.com: “[The manager] was disappointed, like the whole team was. We thought that we had enough to get the win, but we’re a group in training and we’ll work harder to get the win the next game. “It’s important that we bounce back quickly. The December period, there are a lot of games coming up, so we’ve all got to be fit and raring to go and keep the confidence going into those games to try and get as many as we can.” last_img read more

Tour de France: Froome Forced to Run up Mont Ventoux after…

first_imgThe defending champion was overtaken by rivals Adam Yates and Nairo Quintana in the melee but race organisers ruled Froome should retain the overall lead.Thomas de Gendt won stage 12, which had been shortened because of high winds.Speaking to French TV, Froome, the 2013 and 2015 champion said: “I was with Richie Porte and Bauke Mollema and all three of us went into the back of the motorbike. I got hit from behind by another motorbike that broke my bicycle.“I told myself, ‘I don’t have a bike and my car is five minutes behind with another bike – it’s too far away, I’m going to run a bit’.”The Team Sky rider finished one minute and 40 seconds behind Trek-Segafredo’s Mollema, who had immediately managed to remount his bike, and 44 seconds behind BMC’s Porte. But Porte and Froome were given the same time as Mollema, five minutes five seconds behind Lotto Soudal rider De Gendt.Froome said: “I’m happy with the jury’s decision. I think it’s right. Thanks to them and thanks to the Tour de France organisation.”Rocky, Bolt and running the bulls – Froome inspires online hilarity As Froome climbed towards the finish line at Chalet Reynard, Porte rode into the back of a motorbike, which seemed to stop suddenly because of crowds encroaching on to the road. Froome and Bauke Mollema crashed into the Australian and all three fell off their bikes. With his bike damaged, Froome set off on foot as he waited for a replacement.According to the UCI, cycling’s governing body, a cyclist can cross the line on foot but only if they have their bike with them. He attempted to use a neutral service bike before switching to a third bike from the Team Sky car about 200 metres later, eventually crossing the line shaking his head.Froome, who held a 28-second advantage over Yates overnight, extended his lead to 47 seconds, with Quintana – regarded as Froome’s biggest rival before the race – a further seven seconds adrift.Porte, 31, said: “The crowd were all over the road and it was such a mess. It was just crazy.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Britain’s Chris Froome was forced to run without a bike following a crash with a motorbike on one of the most iconic climbs of the Tour de France.Froome crashed with Richie Porte and Bauke Mollema just over one kilometre from the finish on Mont Ventoux.last_img read more