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Cale Tyson: Country Music Done Right

first_imgThe SkinnyJust recently, the unthinkable happened.  My thirteen year old son, who has a keen ear and great taste in music, was manning the iPod on a recent road trip and, to my surprise, a Jason Aldean song was blaring through my speakers.I damned near swerved the minivan off the road.Like much of what you hear on modern country radio, Aldean isn’t country; instead, he and his cronies are Lynyrd Skynyrd sound-alikes with bigger hats.  I have long lamented that country music is floundering; instead of Willie and Hank we have Luke and Toby.But, when things seem forlorn, I come across an artist like Cale Tyson. Living in Nashville now, Cale is Texas born and bred, and he does country the right way; the twang is real, the pedal steel moans, and, most importantly, I believe in what Cale is singing.  It’s honest, and that is what is missing most from so much of what is passed off as country music these days.For Fans OfMerle Haggard, Dwight Yoakam, J.P. Harris & The Tough ChoicesOutside Looking In“I first met Cale where I meet most musicians – in a smoky bar.  Cale and I shared a bill together at The 5 Spot in East Nashville.  I was hooked halfway through the first song of his set.  He was leaning heavily on the material from High On Lonesome, his then unreleased EP.  Two songs really stuck with me – ‘Is The Flame Burning Low’ and ‘Lonesome In Tennessee.’  Both are as honest and authentic as Cale’s native Texas sky and make for perfect nighttime driving music.”— Caleb Caudle, Singer/Songwriter, New Orleans, LA On StageCale just returned from some time off in Mexico and the balance of August finds him away from the stage.  You Nashville cats have it good when he returns, though; Cale will be at the The Basement on September 11th and The 5 Spot on September 19th.In His Own Words“‘Long Gone Girl’ was written about an old flame that I couldn’t quite shake. I’d get so frustrated with myself for constantly going back to something that was just going to cause me more pain. I’d get upset and drive eleven hours home to Texas every once in a while and think, ‘That’s it. I’m going to leave town and clear my head of this whole situation, just get back to Nashville and be over it.’ Then she’d call me while I was there and apologize for whatever had happened and I’d think that everything would be better when I came back to town. It never really did in the long term, and I finally realized that. Some people just aren’t meant to lie in the same bed. There are no hard feelings now though. That’s just the way life goes. At some point, we’re all reaching for something unattainable. You just have to realize that and move on. Hell, though – I think it made for a really good song.”  — Cale Tyson, on the story behind “Long Gone Girl.”On The WebYou can find out more about Cale Tyson, his new EP, and when he might be swinging through your town at www.caletyson.net.  Make sure you also take a listen to “Long Gone Girl” on this month’s Trail Mix.Speaking of that new EP, Cale and Trail Mix would like you to have a copy. You guys know the routine. Take a shot at the trivia question down below, shoot your answer to [email protected], and a winner of a copy of High On Lonesome will be drawn from all the correct answers received by noon tomorrow (Thursday, August 22nd).Question – In a recent chat with Trail Mix, Cale mentioned some themes that are typically found in the quintessential country song.  Much to Jason Aldean’s chagrin, which one of the following did Cale NOT list?(A)  heartache(B)  lifted trucks(C)  loneliness(D)  murder(E)  cheating.Good luck!!last_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Tuesday, April 2

first_imgCartoon on Trump, McCain offensiveI am really saddened by The Daily Gazette’s publishing of the cartoon of Trump tweeting a repulsive tweet dropping poop on Sen. John McCain’s tombstone. I find it very offensive and not newsworthy.Coni TrackiAmsterdam Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionBlame CEOs, not unions, for GE woesI’m glad Michael Davi enjoyed his years at GE starting in l976. I agree “what’s happening lately is disturbing.”While Davi was enjoying gas turbine, I was at headquarters promoting Jones’ program called “Factory of the Future” to modernize U.S. GE manufacturing plants. Jones knew competitors like Siemens had productivity increases of 8 percent a year because of plant- and equipment investments.But don’t blame the unions for resisting automation. I also knew the GE negotiators, Baldwin and later Rocheleau. Yes, the 60s were rough. But in the 70s, the unions supported CEO Reginald Jones’ plans to modernize the 150 U.S. factories to be more competitive.When Jack Welch succeeded Jones in 1981, he canceled the “Factory of the Future” program. He turned GE into a financial company by selling GE consumer-, industrial- and defense businesses. No longer did 10 percent of profits go into R&D. Product development labs were closed. Advanced technology was even sold.  Jones, right before his death, rued the day he supported the GE board and backed Welch and not Stan Gault, who went on to head Rubbermaid and later Goodyear, which are old and very viable U.S. businesses today. Too many greedy CEOs like Welch find it easier and more profitable (for themselves) to harvest a garden rather than grow it.Today, we now have a hedge-fund manager in charge of what is left. Jack Welch has no worries because he left with a golden parachute of $417,361,902 (www.GMIratings.com) plus a $9 million-a-year pension.Mary KuykendallBallston Lake Get facts on failure to act on climateBased on the March 22 Gazette column by Nicolas Lortis, a fellow at the Heritage Foundation, the Green New Deal isn’t needed. He claims if we cut our CO2 emissions by 100 percent, it won’t make a difference. Let’s keep our big gas-hog pickups and SUVs filled with red meat.Yes, do what he suggests. Assume we maintain a 2 percent annual growth in GDP through 2100, and we dump all those nasty regulations on fossil fuel consumption. The United States would add some 370 Gigatons of Carbon (GtC) over the next 81 years. Climate scientists have developed what’s termed the “Carbon Budget.” This states that humans can add only 1000GtC to the atmosphere to limit temperature increase to 2C. As of now, humans have put in 535GtC since 1750, meaning we can add only 465CtC more. If we stay the same, the rest of the world (96 percent of the population) can emit only 95GtC. We get to generate 80 percent of the gases, everyone else 20 percent. Realistically, the world will generate sufficient CO2, that the IPCC 2015 RCP8.5 Scenario best describes our future planet. Global temperatures would be 4.8 degrees C higher in 2100, with CO2 over 900 ppm. This is catastrophic for our planet and my grandchildren. The Green New Deal needs to be seriously evaluated on how it will limit climate change. Let’s start by all becoming familiar with the science. Check out Coursera, a MOOC offering free climate change courses from major universities worldwide. Be concerned.Don CooperAmsterdamMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more