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HMS Kent Joins US Navy in Fight Against ISIL

first_img View post tag: News by topic HMS Kent Joins US Navy in Fight Against ISIL Share this article December 23, 2014 View post tag: fight View post tag: against View post tag: US Navy View post tag: HMS Kent View post tag: Navalcenter_img View post tag: middle east Authorities View post tag: ISIL View post tag: joins More than 300 Royal Navy sailors, aircrew and Royal Marines have been supporting ongoing air strikes against ISIL forces in the Middle East as part of a US Navy carrier battle group.Portsmouth-based frigate HMS Kent, two Sea King helicopters from 849 Naval Air Squadron and support ship RFA Fort Austin joined Carrier Strike Group One, led by the USS Carl Vinson whose F/A 18 Hornets have been striking at ISIL targets as part of Operation Inherent Resolve.The Sea Kings, using their radars to provide the task group early warning of any threats by sea or air, joined EA-18G Growlers of Electronic Attack Squadron 139 and E-2C Hawkeyes AWACs aircraft in Gulf skies as part of efforts to support air strikes and shield the task group.As well as the 100,000-tonne carrier at the heart of the force, the task group comprised cruiser USS Bunker Hill, three Arleigh-Burke class destroyers as well as HMS Kent.HMS Kent is one of more than half a dozen Royal Navy warships and RFA support vessels deployed east of Suez over the Christmas period. And more than 3000 Royal Navy, RFA and Royal Marine personnel are deployed across the world over the festive period.HMS Kent’s operations come as the US and Royal Navies set out their vision for future co-operation with the Combined Seapower narrative.[mappress mapid=”14818″]Press release, Image: UK Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today HMS Kent Joins US Navy in Fight Against ISIL View post tag: Navylast_img read more

Bulldogs Ripley County Middle School Track Champs

first_imgRipley County Middle School Track Meet Results @ Jac-Cen-Del.Girls Scores: Batesville 90, Jac-Cen-Del 73, South Ripley 17,       Milan 4.Bulldogs Results:  Discus-2 Katie Bedel (58’4”)  4 Georgie Doll (46’6”); Shot Put-2 Katie Bedel (25’9”)  5 Georgie Doll (22’1”); High Jump-1 Katie Bedel (4’7”)  5 Carley Pride (4’); Long Jump-1 Madelyn Pohlman (12’2”)  3 Olivia Dick (11’0.5”); 100M Hurdles-3 Sydnee Schaefer (20.1)  4 Cora Deputy (21.3); 100M-1 Chloe Schroeder (14.7)  2 Madelyn Pohlman (15.2); 200M-1 Lily Meyer (31.2)  2 Ava Hanson (31.2); 400M-1 Chloe Schroeder (1:05.2)  2 Carley Pride (1:06.6); 800M-1 Katie Olsen (2:41)  3 Maria Lopez (2:49); 1600M-2 Lily Pinckley (6:09)  3 Lexi Huber (6:15); 400M Relay-1 BMS Katie Olsen, Katie Bedel, Lily Meyer, Madelyn Pohlman (58.3); 1600M Relay-1 BMS Ava Hanson, Chloe Schroeder, Sarah Ripperger, Carley Pride (4:46).Boys Scores:  Batesville 57, Jac-Cen-Del 49, Milan 42, South Ripley 36.Bulldogs Results:  Discus-5 Luke Nuhring (91’4”); High Jump-2 Eli Pierson (5’2”)  3 Will Gunter (5’2”); Long Jump-2 Ethan Brewer (15’2”)  4 Sam Robben (14’11”); 110M Hurdles-2 Sam Robben (19.1)  3 Ethan Brewer (19.4); 100M-3 James Kuisel (13.5); 200M-3 Kavin Saravanan (27.8)  5 James Kuisel (28.2); 400M-3 Eli Pierson (1:04.6); 800M-1 Ean Loichinger (2:20.2)  2 James Kuisel (2:20.5); 1600M-1 Ean Loichinger (5:07)  2 Dillon Murray (5:20); 1600M Relay-1 BMS Eli Pierson, Will Gunter, Dillon Murray, Ean Loichinger (4:16).Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Derek Suits.last_img read more

FIFA Qatar 2022 plan would ‘exacerbate’ Gulf tensions

first_imgHe said FIFA proposals to share the Qatar World Cup with Kuwait and Oman would reinforce the feeling that the Gulf has split into two competing blocs of three countries, with Saudi, UAE and Bahrain on the other side.“From a political point of view, it [expansion] doesn’t make sense.”Even if Qatar is forced to share its World Cup, the first in the Middle East, it is unlikely to please Riyadh or Abu Dhabi, adds Krieg.“I don’t see how Saudi and the UAE get anything out of that,” he says.– Football won’t solve crisis –Yet FIFA’s plans to expand the 2022 World Cup appear to be gaining support among some football administrators.The results of a much-vaunted FIFA “feasibility study”, announced at a meeting of football’s governing body last week in Miami, backed expansion in Qatar.“We came to the conclusion, yes it’s feasible to move from 32 to 48 teams at the World Cup provided certain conditions are met,” Infantino said, declaring himself “happy” with the finding.A final decision will be announced in Paris in June, and while the expansion plan has been gaining a seemingly irresistible momentum, some remain unconvinced.Europe’s governing body, UEFA, said expansion would create “many problems” and was “not realistic”.Campaigners warned FIFA not to neglect its own newly imposed standards on human rights when awarding World Cup host status.Any expansion would see an extra 16 matches played over the duration of the 28-day tournament and there are concerns over whether stadiums and infrastructure in Kuwait and Oman would meet exacting FIFA tournament standards.With so many issues, it is difficult to see any diplomatic dividend from the World Cup, said James Dorsey, a researcher at Singapore’s S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies and author of “The Turbulent World of Middle East Soccer”.“I think there’s zero chance,” he said.“The Gulf crisis is not going to be solved by playing football.”Share on: WhatsApp FILE PHOTO; FIFA President Gianni InfantinoDoha, Qatar | AFP | FIFA President Gianni Infantino’s plan to expand the Qatar World Cup to 48 teams and increase the number of host countries risks worsening existing Gulf diplomatic tensions, claim analysts.The ambitious expansion proposal — which Infantino has optimistically stated might help Middle East peace — could see the extra matches hosted in Kuwait and Oman in 2022.But far from making a politically turbulent region more harmonious, analysts say FIFA’s proposal could deepen regional fissures and leave Kuwait and Oman, as well as Qatar, open to further political arm-twisting from the regional power bloc of Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain.“There is a very real risk that expanding the World Cup to include Kuwait and Oman would make these two countries vulnerable to the same sort of regional pressure Qatar has faced since 2017,” said Kristian Coates Ulrichsen, a research fellow at Rice University.“Particularly since Kuwait and Oman also have followed their own approaches to regional affairs.”It could also foster resentment in those countries missing out on games, notably Saudi Arabia and the UAE, Ulrichsen added.“The idea of a regional World Cup that includes Kuwait and Oman but not Saudi Arabia or the UAE would likely be a cause of considerable bitterness in Riyadh and Abu Dhabi.”– ‘Makes no sense’ –Since June 2017, World Cup host Qatar has been blockaded by the Saudi-led countries in a bitter political spat, one of the worst Gulf diplomatic conflicts for years.Saudi Arabia and its allies, which also include Egypt, accuse Qatar of promoting terrorism and being too close to Riyadh’s great political and religious rival, Tehran.Qatar denies its rivals’ allegations and accuses them of seeking regime change in Doha.For 21 months — and counting — Saudi Arabia and it allies have imposed a political, economic and travel boycott around Qatar which shows few signs of easing.Notably though, the blockading countries do not include the traditionally neutral Gulf states of Kuwait and Oman, which have been left to tread a politically precarious line.Andreas Krieg of King’s College London, who has worked as an adviser to the Qatari government, said Kuwait and Oman “both have issues with Saudi and the UAE”.Tensions have flared between Kuwait and Saudi Arabia over the management of jointly owned oil fields, while Oman has faced allegations that it has allowed Iranian arms shipments through its territory to Huthi rebels fighting a Saudi-led coalition in Yemen.At the same time, Kuwait has been the regional negotiator in the crisis, while Oman is an economic winner from the conflict, its trade with Qatar jumping 240 per cent since 2016, according to Doha.“The Gulf dispute as it exists would be further exacerbated by having a World Cup over three countries,” added Krieg.last_img read more

Marsh see Marsh smash: Mitchell Marsh set for a stint on the sidelines after…

first_imgImage Courtesy: Stumps and BailsAdvertisement f9ioNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vsbwk9lWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E9( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) xklWould you ever consider trying this?😱c05Can your students do this? 🌚7pk4aeRoller skating! Powered by Firework Australian all-rounder Mitchell Marsh will be out for four to six weeks after suffering a fracture to his right hand. The fracture resulted after Marsh punched a wall in a fit of rage after his dismissal in a Sheffield Shield encounter.Advertisement Image Courtesy: Stumps and BailsThe injury means that Marsh will miss the start of the Aussie home season. The incident took place during Western Australia’s clash against Tasmania where Marsh took out his frustration with a punch on the dressing room wall after his dismissal.The all-rounder managed to suffer a fracture despite donning his batting gloves on, which gives a glimpse of the impact imparted by the punch. He managed to comment on this peculiar situation by stating:Advertisement “It’s a good lesson for me, hopefully it’s a good lesson for other people as well,” he told reporters.“It’s pretty uncharacteristic of me to want to punch a wall. I’m a pretty easygoing sort of bloke. The point I wanted to stress to the lads (was) that I was really sorry and it’s not an example I wanted to be setting.”Advertisement Read Also:Sourav Ganguly : Heading BCCI will be easier than captaining India!Echoing dominance : Indian women’s cricket team wraps up ODI series against South Africa 3-0 Advertisementlast_img read more