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Viral video captures brawl in North Jakarta waters

first_imgA video of young people brawling in the waters of a seafront area in Kalibaru subdistrict, Cilincing, North Jakarta, has gone viral on social media, prompting authorities to stand guard near the location.The video, posted on Sunday by Instagram account @jakut.info, showed dozens of young people having a confrontation in the waters while swimming, some of them carrying various kinds of sharp weapons. Topics : Responding to the video, Cilincing Police chief Comr. Imam T. B. said most of the people involved in the brawl were Cilincing residents. He then sent personnel to visit the location, despite it being outside of his authority.“We went to the location and they disbanded immediately,” Imam told tempo.co on Wednesday, adding that some of the youths threw their weapons into the sea.According to a press release issued by the North Jakarta administration on Tuesday, the police also detained two teenagers with sharp weapons and ceramic shards.In the statement, Kalibaru subdistrict head Slamet Alfarizi said that police, military and Public Order Agency (Satpol PP) personnel, as well as local residents, also conducted patrols in the past three days around the area to prevent another brawl.Cilincing district head Muhammad Andri commended the joint patrol.“May our hard work build a safe and orderly Kalibaru for all of us.” (mfp)center_img “On Sunday at 5 p.m., there was a brawl on the coast of Jakarta; a group of youths was seen fighting,” the caption of the Instagram post said.last_img read more

Professor remembered for innovative mind

first_imgSolomon Golomb, a professor of electrical engineering and mathematics who died May 1 at the age of 83, will be remembered for his groundbreaking work in communications theory.“I found Sol to be a man of high character and integrity. He was certainly a wonderful father and husband. … Sol was very humble, and a very kind person,” said William Lindsey, a professor of electrical engineering. “On the mathematical side, he was likened to a Gauss or a Pascal or a Euler.”After receiving his Ph.D. in mathematics from Harvard University, Golomb worked as the deputy chief of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab’s Telecommunications Research Section before joining USC’s faculty in 1963. In his 53 years as a professor, Golomb established USC as a leading institution for communications research. He was a member of the “Magnificent Seven,” a group of the  top communications researchers at the University who founded the USC Communications Sciences Institute.“He got recruited to USC, and he helped recruit a number of other people who were working at JPL and other areas as well, and there was this core faculty working on communications theory in the early ‘60s who made enormous advances,” said Todd Brun, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science. “At this point, there are only three left, so it’s kind of the passing of an era.”Among his many contributions to the fields of communications and cryptography, Golomb defined polyominoes, the basis for the game Tetris, and developed techniques for analyzing shift register sequences. This research is integral to the function of cellphones and the internet today. He spoke several languages, including Hebrew and French, and was known for inventing mathematical games, including a variant of checkers called “cheskers.”Robert Scholtz, a professor of electrical engineering, described Golomb’s mental acuity and diverse research interests.“His mind never stopped working. I would suspect that he got three or four hours of sleep at night. He was always thinking about various kinds of problems — not just mathematical problems, though that was his specialty,” Scholtz said. “He spoke many languages, he was very interested in religion and history, and he had an almost-encyclopedic knowledge of everything in those areas.”For his work in digital communications, Golomb was awarded the Franklin Institute’s 2016 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Electrical Engineering. He was also presented with the National Medal of Science in 2013 from President Barack Obama. He served as president of the Faculty Senate and the vice provost for research. These contributions helped him earn the Presidential Medallion, USC’s highest honor for faculty members.Beyond his own research, Golomb also advanced the department through recruitment. He recruited many researchers to USC’s electrical engineering faculty, including Lindsey and Lloyd Welch, a professor emeritus of electrical engineering. He also served as a mentor to Andrew Viterbi, later the namesake of the Viterbi School of Engineering, while working as his supervisor at JPL, a connection that forged a lifelong bond.Brun spoke about the leadership and guidance Golomb demonstrated toward his colleagues and students.“He was one of the most brilliant people I ever met. I think that was the impression of most people who knew him,” Brun said. “But Sol was also a mentor. I wouldn’t be here without him, so I’m very grateful to him. He was a very kind man, looked after his students and his colleagues, did a lot of service to USC, and that’s important too. It’s not just being the smartest guy in the room, but what you use that for and how you treat other people. And he was very high up there in that area as well.”George Bekey, a professor emeritus of electrical engineering, recalled one memory that for him that to him summed up Golomb’s remarkable intellect and insight.“I was walking with Dr. Golomb on the way to the faculty center one day, and for a good ten minutes, he was really quiet, he didn’t say a thing. Eventually, he turned and smiled, and I said, ‘So what are you thinking about?’. He said, ‘Oh, I was solving a mathematical problem in my head. That was Golomb,” Bekey said.He is survived by his wife, Bodil, and his daughters, Astrid and Beatrice.last_img read more

CONGU launches updated website

first_img26 Oct 2016 CONGU launches updated website The Board of CONGU® – the Council of National Golf Unions – has announced the launch of their new, updated website.Chairman, Jim McArthur commented: “This has been a long process with much thought being given particularly to the layout of the website and to how this would best serve our aims and objectives.“We have set out to make the site simpler to use and to be more instructional for both players and club officials alike. There are many players who are quite happy to accept the handicap system as it is without wishing to know in detail how it works, but there are also those who have a desire to understand the handicapping system better, and have often criticised CONGU for not making it simpler to understand.“Hopefully, the addition of the Quick Guides, and a complete online manual will help to address these criticisms, and we invite golfers and club officials alike to visit  www.congu.com”Image © Leaderboard Photographylast_img read more