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FIFA hails Osimhen for breaking African transfer record

first_img Promoted ContentThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?Which Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooWhat’s Up With All The Female Remakes?7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The Universe10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The WorldWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?10 Phones That Can Work For Weeks Without Recharging5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made Loading… The former Golden Eaglets ace in the process emerged Nigeria’s most expensive player after seeing off Alex Iwobi’s £30m transfer to Everton. Read Also: De Laurentiis: Osimhen actually cost Napoli €80m “All the best in this next chapter of your career, Victor!” FIFA wrote on its official Twitter account moments after the deal was announced. Interestingly, Osimhen kick-started his international career at the FIFA U-17 World cup in Chile back in 2015, carting home the top-scorer award and the winners medal. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img “From starring at the #U17WC with @NGSuperEagles in 2015 to becoming @en_sscnapoli’s marquee signing. World’s football governing body, Federation of International Football Association, FIFA has hailed Super Eagles forward Victor Osimhen after sealing a record transfer from Lille to Napoli. Osimhen joined the Italian Serie A side on Thursday, July 31, for a record of €50m plus additional bonuses, a year after signing for Lille from Charleroi for just €12m.last_img read more

Dodgers, Angels will distribute combined $2.5 million to event staff

first_imgThe suspension is an optional thing for individual teams. The Angels are in the majority of teams that have told their baseball operations employees they will continue to be paid through the month of May. The San Diego Padres told employees they would be paid through the end of the 2020 season though some will be asked to take paycuts.The Dodgers, meanwhile, would not comment on the status of their baseball ops staffers. A team official said it was something the team was still working through internally.Related Articles LOS ANGELES — The Dodgers put in place a distribution program Tuesday that will pay $1.3 million to game-day workers put out of work by MLB’s shutdown during the coronavirus pandemic.The payouts from the fund will go to “event staff, concessions, parking, cleaning personnel employed by third party contractors and the Dodgers Foundation event staff.”The Angels announced Sunday that they would be making approximately $1.2 million in payments to more than 1,800 game-day employees.Meanwhile, MLB commissioner Rob Manfred has reportedly told teams he will suspend the Uniform Employee Contracts as of May 1. That would allow teams to cut the salaries of non-playing employees or impose unpaid furloughs with the sport shut down indefinitely. Manfred’s move is allowed in the case of national emergencies. In the case of layoffs or furloughs, some lower-salaried employees could be eligible for unemployment benefits.MLB has also reportedly begun negotiations with the players’ union to cut player salaries if games are eventually played without fans in attendance. Those games would obviously produce no ticket (or concession) revenue.According to an ESPN report, Manfred’s email to team employees included the acknowledgement that “it is very difficult to predict with any accuracy the timeline for resumption of our season. Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies Angels fail to take series in Oakland, lose in 10 innings Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

State Representative Ed Trimmer provides 2013 legislative session wrapup

first_imgby Ed Trimmer, Kansas State Representative, District 79 (Northwest Cowley and Northeast Sumner Counties) — The Kansas Legislature has completed the 2013 Legislative Session.  As expected, it was another difficult year filled with complicated and controversial issues.Ed TrimmerAfter working into the night, we adjourned at around 2 a.m. on the 99th day of the session.  The Speaker of the House had predicted an 80-Day session, due to the overwhelming majorities of Brownback supported conservatives in both the House and Senate.  Because the session ran nine days over the traditional 90-day session, I will be donating my additional salary to high school student councils in my district which includes Belle Plaine, Oxford, Udall and Winfield.I will be conducting my bi-annual listening tour in July.  The tour will be at several locations in each of the communities in our district.  I will spend a few hours at each location.  I want to meet you and listen to what you have to say.  A tour schedule is included in this newsletter.Here is what I consider the most important issues of the wrap-up session.Common Core Education Standards:For many years, the American public has demanded more accountability for public education.    In response, the National Governor’s Association and the Council of Chief State Education Officers began creating common core standards as early as 2003, during the Bush administration.  Since then, at least 45 states have worked cooperatively for over 10 years to establish standards that are common and more rigorous for each grade level.  Each state sets their own set of standards using the common core as a bench-mark and each school has the freedom to decide textbooks and curriculum to meet the standards.This session, legislation was proposed to abolish common core standards.  Many proponents based their arguments on a wide variety of misinformation.  Many more people representing educators, administrators, state school board members, local school board members and businesspeople testified against the ban and for the standards.  The bill failed in the House Education Committee on a bi-partisan vote of seven (Republicans) for and 11 (six Republicans and five Democrats) against.  I actively opposed the bill.On the last day of the session, a few House members demanded that the Senate pass a bill to de-fund common core standards not already adopted or they would not vote for the budget and push the wrap-up session into its 100th day.  The Senate passed a bill and sent it to the House but it failed to get the 63 votes it needed to pass.It is important to note, that common core standards are not a federal mandate, would not cost Kansas tens of millions of dollars and do not involve increased data collection by federal officials.  These standards are supported by many Fortune 500 companies, the United States Chamber of Commerce and the U.S. Army. The Army likes the idea that military families can move from state to state and their children will be educated with the same standards for each grade.  For complete information and a list of standards, concerned citizens can consult the Kansas State Department of Education and the Kansas State Board of Education web sites.The 2014 and 2015 budget bill:The state budget is more than just a list of expenditures.  It is an expression of our values.  I voted against the budget bill because it goes against the values we hold as Kansans.  The self-inflicted budget crisis in which we find ourselves, threatens education, public safety, early childhood programs and employment.Kansas colleges and universities are cut by nearly $66 million over the next two years.  This will threaten the overall quality and stature of our colleges and universities while forcing higher costs onto Kansas families in the form of higher tuition rates.The budget raids funds for early childhood education taking $9.5 million from the children’s initiatives fund.  This fund uses money awarded to the state as part of the settlement with tobacco companies.This budget fails to address K-12 school funding.  Our public schools were cut drastically in recent years and a Kansas Appeals Court ruled back in January that school funding was over $400 million short of where it should be.  Instead of addressing this, legislators chose to give more tax breaks to the wealthy.The state highway fund is raided for another $300 million over the next two years to cover state general fund obligations.  This means less money for important safety improvements for our Kansas roads and highways.Cuts to the Department of Corrections will threaten supervision of sex offenders as well as parole supervision, mental health and substance abuse treatment for inmates.  According to Brownback’s Secretary of Corrections, with these cuts “we will be spending far more than we save with the potential for increased victimization of Kansans due to an increased rate of untreated, unsupervised offenders in our communities.”Much like the budgets we see coming out of Washington D.C., under this budget Kansas borrows heavily from bonded projects or adds new bond indebtedness.  The State is projected to spend $628 million more than it brings in through revenue over the next five years.Even with $777 million in new taxes, the budget will be $23.7 million in the hole by FY 2018, assuming no new expenditures for the next five years if only to keep pace with inflation.The tax plan:Last year, the legislature eliminated almost all business income tax, which I voted against. During his 2013 “State of the State” speech, the Governor again pushed for additional income tax cuts with the stated goal of eliminating the personal income tax altogether.  To pay for the income tax cuts that disproportionately benefit the wealthy, the Governor sought to shift the tax burden to the working poor and middle class Kansas families.Included in the final tax plan was a permanent extension of the temporary sales tax increase passed in 2009.  Raising the sales tax generates $1.1 billion dollars over the next five years and results in more than $145 million in higher taxes on food.Kansans pay the ninth highest combined local and state sales tax rates in the United States. The average Kansan pays $868 in sales taxes each year. This is 15 percent higher than the national average and 39 percent higher than a five state region including Kansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Missouri.The tax plan also raises taxes on Kansans by cutting standard deductions on single heads of households and married couples filing jointly by $311 million and reduces itemized deductions for items such as home mortgage interest and property taxes paid by an additional $664 million.  Only the very wealthy will see any income tax benefit.The legislature isn’t required to pass a tax plan before adjourning, but it is necessary to pass a budget.  Senate Republicans refused to hold a vote on the budget without first passing a tax plan, effectively forcing negotiations on a tax plan before the 2013 legislature could adjourn. In the end, this resulted in a $777 million tax increase on low to middle income working families over the next five years.I voted against the tax plan because it fails to fix the budget crisis created by last years business income tax elimination, forces cuts to public safety and education, and forces the working poor and middle class Kansans to pay for tax breaks that benefit the wealthy.Washington style politics in Kansas?In 2010, Brownback Conservatives, the Kansas Chamber, and the Republican Assembly as well as tea-party groups, criticized Kansas Democrats for voting for the three-year (temporary) sales tax, calling it the largest tax increase in state history.In 2012, these same groups blamed Moderate Republicans in the Senate for gridlock in Topeka. and criticized them for voting for the 3-year (temporary) sales tax.This year, with the Brownback Conservatives in control of the House and Senate, there was still gridlock, resulting in 9 extra days in session at taxpayer’s expense.  Instead of the sales tax reverting back to 5.7 percent on July 2013, it will remain at 6.15 percent indefinitely.When the national economy was bad and Kansas needed the temporary sales tax, those voting for it were criticized.  Today, Kansas suffers from a self-inflicted budget crisis caused by last year’s tax plan.  Those who criticized the sales tax increase before now support it.  Confused?  Me, too!Listening tour schedule: I will buy the coffee and listen.  I want to hear what you think.Thursday, July 11, Belle PlaineCasey’s 6:30 – 11 a.m.Senior Center 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.Friday, July 12, OxfordAngie D’s Cafe 6:30 – 9 a.m.COOP 9:30 – 11 a.m.Senior Center -  11:30 a.m.- 1 p.m.Monday, July 15th,  WinfieldCollege Hill Coffee 7:30-11 a.m.Tuesday, July 16th,  WinfieldBiederman’s 6:30 – 10 a.m.Wednesday, July 17,  UdallPhillips 66 6:30- 9 a.m.Eagle Convenience Store 9-10 a.m.1.  Should alcohol be sold at retail food outlets in addition to liquor stores?Yes  30, No  127   I did not support the concept.2.  Should the one-cent sales tax be extended beyond the promised elimination date of July 1, 2013?Yes  68 , No  88     I voted not to extend of the sales tax.3.  Would you favor a system that allows the Governor to select court of appeals judges directly?Yes  17, No  138    I voted no on this issue.4.  Do you favor the elimination of the Home Mortgage Interest Exemption?Yes  22, No  130    I voted not to cut or eliminate the exemption.5.  Should the issue of where concealed weapons are carried be decided at the state level not the local level?Yes  71 , No  82     I voted to keep local control.6.  Should adults with conceal/carry permits be allowed to carry weapons in public schools?Yes  57 No  98     I voted to prohibit anyone but law enforcement, unless the local district decided  otherwise, which is current law.7.  Should adults with conceal/carry permits be allowed to carry weapons on college campuses?Yes  64 No  96.  I voted to leave it up to the college.8.  Should adults with conceal/carry permits be allowed to carry weapons in government offices and court houses?Yes  45  No  110    I voted to leave it up to the local entity.9.  Should investor owned corporate farms be allowed in Kansas?Yes  25  No  127    The issue did not come to the House floor.I deeply appreciate the contact I received from so many constituents in recent months.  I worked hard to ensure the interests of our district were addressed under the Dome.  If I can ever be of assistance to you or your family, please do not hesitate to contact me at my Capitol office 785-296-7122 (when we are in session) or at home 620-221-7146. You can e-mail me at [email protected]  If you would like frequent e-mail updates during the session, just let me know and I will add you to my update list. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (2) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +2 Vote up Vote down OurVotes Rlost · 373 weeks ago I miss having our representative in Wellington………….. Report Reply 0 replies · active 373 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down MJE · 373 weeks ago Mr. Trimmer, Let’s set aside the fact that the Common Core standards were developed by corporate interests, not classroom educators, and look at the standards themselves. Do you honestly feel that “Recommended Levels of Insulation by the the US Environmental Protection Agency,” and the “Invasive Plant Inventory,” by California’s Invasive Plant Council, are good reading texts to use in schools? Do you see any significance in the fact that James Milgram, the only mathematician on the validation panel, refused to sign off on the math standards, stating that they are actually two years behind those of other advanced nations? Keep in mind that the Common Core standards are subject to copyright and states that adopt them are very limited in the changes and additions that can be made. Do you feel the product placement is appropriate that has been reported in the tests Pearson has developed to comply with Common Core? Report Reply 0 replies · active 373 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

Religious Events Calendar

first_imgUnity Center Church of Thousand Oaks events: Yard sale, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. today and Sunday, 77 Los Vientos Drive, Newbury Park; “A Soulful Concert,” performed by Peter Shea and Stefana DadasU, 7 p.m. today, in the church sanctuary, 1414 E. Thousand Oaks Blvd. Tickets: $5. Monthly meditation meeting with guest Suemary Long, 6-7 p.m. Tuesday, 1414 E. Thousand Oaks Blvd. An offering will be taken. Call (805) 496-6901. “Lit Up!” performances by actors Marcia Wallace and Susan Neale, 8 p.m. today, St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church, 3646 Coldwater Canyon Ave., Studio City. Admission: $20. Also: April 8, performers Wayne Federman and Winnie Holtzman. Call (818) 763-9193. The Rev. Bob Jones, chancellor of Bob Jones University, will be the guest speaker, 8:30 and 11 a.m. Sunday, Lighthouse Bible Church, 4910 Cochran St., Simi Valley. Potluck dinner: 5 p.m. Call (805) 584-8222 or see www.similighthouse.org. “Truth and Fiction in the Da Vinci Code,” a seminar led by the Rev. Rick Talbott, a university professor and authority on early Christian history, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Sundays, First Church of Christ, 606 Chatsworth Drive, San Fernando. Call (818) 361-7321. Weekly meditation service, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Center of Spiritual Awakening, meeting at 21032 Devonshire St., Suite 208, Chatsworth. Call (818) 709-1451. “The Celestine Prophecy,” a sneak preview screening, 7:30 p.m. Friday and 1 p.m. April 9, Westlake Church of Religious Science, 880 Hampshire Road. Tickets: $10. Call (805) 495-0105, Ext. 3, or see www.westlakecrs.org. “Sister Stories: From Egypt to Darfur,” a Shabbat service led by Rabbi Nina Bieber Feinstein and performers Debbie Friedman and Cindy Paley, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. April 8, Valley Beth Shalom, 15739 Ventura Blvd., Encino. Event is part of “Let My People Sing,” a multievent Passover-theme program held at various venues in the Los Angeles area. Free but reservations are required. Call (818) 530-4000, Ext. 1, or see www.letmypeoplesing.com. Second Night Community Passover Seder, presented by Temple Beth Torah, 16651 Rinaldi St., Granada Hills, 6 p.m. April 13. Tickets: $35, $15 for children 12 and younger. Paid reservations due by April 10. Call (818) 831-0835. “Action: The Antidote to Despair” will be the message delivered by the Rev. Bonnie Rowsell, 10 a.m. Sunday, Glendale Church of Religious Science, 2146 E. Chevy Chase Drive. Call (818) 244-8171. “Famous Alibis” will be the message delivered by the Rev. Thomas E. Witherspoon, 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Unity Church of the Valley, 2817 Montrose Ave., La Crescenta. Call (818) 249-4396. “The Christ Principle” will be the message delivered by the Revs. Sue Rubin and Jim Lockard, 10 a.m. Sunday, Westlake Church of Religious Science, 880 Hampshire Road, Westlake Village. Call (805) 495-0105 or see www.westlakecrs.org. “A Compassionate People” will be the message delivered by the Rev. Bob McDill, 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Sepulveda Unitarian Universalist Society, 9550 Haskell Ave., North Hills. Call (818) 894-9251. “Edge of the End” will be the message delivered by the Rev. Dale Johnsen, 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Heart of the Valley Community Church, 18644 Sherman Way, Reseda. Call (818) 881-3651 or see www.heartchurch.com. “Follow Me” will be the message delivered by the Rev. Lynn Enloe, 10:15 a.m. Sunday, Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 9 W. Bonita Drive, Simi Valley. Call (805) 583-0556. “God Loves You” will be the message delivered by the Rev. Evelyn Hammond, 10 a.m. Sunday, Center for Highly Effective Living, Church of Religious Science, meeting at Pacific Lodge Youth Services, 4900 Serrania Ave., Woodland Hills. Call (818) 883-1300. “Putting Women in Their Place” will be the message delivered by the Rev. Dave Wilkinson, 8:15 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday, Moorpark Presbyterian Church, 13950 Peach Hill Road. Call (805) 529-8422. “The Sin of Man” will be the message delivered by the Rev. Glenn Kirby, 8:45, 10:15 and 11:45 a.m. Sunday, West Valley Christian Church, 22450 Sherman Way, West Hills. Call (818) 884-6480. “Spring Ahead for Christians” will be the message of the Rev. Paul N. Shafit, 10:30 a.m. Sunday, The Welcome Home Church, meeting at 7248 Owensmouth Ave., Canoga Park. Call (818) 314-3664. “Starting Over” will be the message delivered by the Rev. Lui Tran, 10 a.m. Sunday, Knollwood United Methodist Church, 12121 Balboa Blvd., Granada Hills. Call (818) 360-8111. “Wisdom” will be the message delivered by the Rev. Carrie Lauer, 10 a.m. Sunday, Center of Spiritual Awakening, meeting at the Radisson Hotel, 9777 Topanga Canyon Blvd., Chatsworth. Call (818) 709-1451. Traditional English Mass, celebrated by the Rev. Scott Kingsbury, 11:15 a.m. Sunday, The Anglican Church of St. Barnabas the Apostle, meeting at All Saints Community Church, 8040 Glenoaks Blvd., Sun Valley. Call (626) 818-4721. Religion events are compiled by Staff Writer Holly Andres. Notices appearing in the events column must reach the Daily News two weeks before the Saturday on which they are to run. Items must be typewritten. Phone numbers must be included for contact purposes. Mail to Religion Calendar, P.O. Box 4200, Woodland Hills, CA 91365-4200. Fax (818) 713-0058 or e-mail without attachments to [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl event Tridentine Mass, the Latin rite Mass, celebrated by Msgr. Francis J. Weber, noon Sunday, Mission San Fernando Rey de Espana, 15151 San Fernando Mission Blvd. Call (818) 361-0186. Dona Gracia Nasi, a Jewish leader during the Renaissance, will be discussed by Bruce Ullman at 3 p.m. Sunday, Temple Beth Torah, 16651 Rinaldi St., Granada Hills. Admission: $5. Call (818) 831-0835 or see www.bethtorah-sfv.org. The University: A Multi-Parish Adult Education Program, with more than 70 classes and events during Lent through Wednesday. Most classes are 7:30-9 p.m. Monday-Thursday. Catalog of classes available at participating Roman Catholic parishes in Ventura County. Admission: $7, includes one guest. “Dining with the Pharisees: Taking a Second Look at First Century Judaism,” led by the Rev. Pat Mullen, Tuesday, St. Mary Magdalen Church, 5205 Upland Road, Camarillo. Call (805) 482-6417. “A Healing Mass,” led by the Rev. John Struzzo, Wednesday, St. Paschal Baylon Church, 155 E. Janss Road, Thousand Oaks. Call (805) 496-0222. “Silent Prayer,” a lecture by Robert Brown, Thursday, library at St. Rose of Lima Church, 1305 Royal Ave., Simi Valley. Call (805) 526-1732. General information at (805) 496-0222. Los Angeles Jewish Film Festival: Short films, “The Night Trotsky Came to Dinner” and “From Philadelphia to the Front,” 7 p.m. Tuesday, Temple Beth Haverim, 29900 Ladyface Court, Agoura Hills. Admission: $10. Sponsored by The New JCC at Milkin in West Hills. Call (818) 991-7111 or see www.lajfilmfest.org. Catholic Community luncheon meeting, 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, meeting at Beverly Garland’s Holiday Inn, 4222 Vineland Ave., North Hollywood. Guest speaker the Rev. John Struzzo will discuss “Spiritual Warfare: Engaging the Battle.” Reservations: $15, required. Call (818) 846-3271. last_img read more