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Grid operator says Texas electricity now 30% carbon-free

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:Texas may be the center of the U.S. oil and gas industry, but the latest data shows that the state’s competitive energy market is increasingly favoring clean energy over fossil fuel alternatives.New information from state grid operator ERCOT shows that carbon-free resources made up more than 30 percent of its 2018 energy consumption, and a slightly larger percentage of its 2019 generation capacity. In both cases, the largest share of credit goes to the state’s massive wind farms, which provided 18.6 percent of 2018 energy and make up 23.4 percent of 2019 capacity, followed by nuclear power, which served 10.9 percent of last year’s needs and will provide 5.4 percent of this year’s capacity.Solar, meanwhile, only made up a sliver of the 1.3 percent of last year’s energy use served by “other” resources such as hydropower, biomass and fuel oil. But solar will make up 2.1 percent of this year’s generation capacity, in a testament to the small but fast-growing utility-scale solar market developing in the state.ERCOT’s achievement is largely a result of the economics of wind and solar power, plus a healthy dollop of state energy policy to integrate its western wind resources to eastern cities, known as competitive renewable energy zones (CREZ). Since 2009, about when CREZ got started, wind generation capacity has grown from 6 percent to nearly 20 percent of ERCOT’s energy mix, while coal has fallen from 37 percent to 25 percent of ERCOT’s energy mix over the same time.Meanwhile, the amount of wind being curtailed due to lack of transmission and demand has shrunk from about 17 percent in 2009 to less than half a percent in recent years, a result of the $7 billion in new transmission enabled by CREZ, as well as ERCOT’s work to build weather forecasting and demand management into how it manages its grid.Solar meets only a fraction of ERCOT’s needs compared to wind, but its growth rate is much faster at present, with utility-scale projects in the state setting new low-price records alongside solar leaders like California, Arizona and Nevada. Much of this solar is in West Texas, where it can benefit from the same transmission investments that have enabled the wind industry, Rhodes noted.More: Texas grid operator reports fuel mix is now 30% carbon-free Grid operator says Texas electricity now 30% carbon-freelast_img read more

What makes for motivation

first_imgJeremy Gregg at the Raiser’s Razor blog asked me to answer the following question: What drives your philanthropassion? In other words, why have I, like you, chosen to be overworked and underpaid in the third sector?Part of the answer for me is, I spent a number of years working as a journalist in very poor countries. And the poverty and pain I saw on a daily basis was hard to simply witness, over and over. So I stopped reporting and started working to remedy what I was seeing. (This is not to say journalism does not do much to contribute to the social good or to right wrongs – it does. I just wanted to be more involved in the story.)So part of my motivation is based on need.But the bigger part of it is based on change. I saw enough good when I was reporting that I also grew to believe there was hope in most situations. And that, ultimately, is the most motivating thing of all.I started my book this way: We all have moments in life when we happen upon our calling, and mine was when I encountered a giant, smiling condom in Cambodia. I go on to tell the story of being inspired by the ground-breaking work of the nonprofit PSI to make AIDS prevention fun and hopeful (including via a giant condom balloon), to great success. I saw the good in the story and possibility in the future.I think ultimately, what makes for the most powerful motivation (at least for me) is not how bad something is now but rather how much better it could be.last_img read more

Green living classes to be taught by masters

first_imgClark County’s Master Composter/Recycler program is accepting registrations for a series of workshops intended to educate the community on how to reduce its impact on natural resources. The series of workshops are taught by “master” composters and recyclers and cover topics including composting, gardening, green cleaning and creating worm bins.The classes include:• Backyard composting: 10 a.m.-noon, Center for Agriculture, Science and Environmental Education, 11104 N.E. 149th St., Brush Prairie, and 6-8 p.m. June 20, 78th Street Heritage Farm, 1919 N.E. 78th St. Learn how to build a backyard compost pile that turns yard waste into garden gold.• Lasagna gardening: 10 a.m.-noon June 3, Center for Agriculture, Science and Environmental Education, 11104 N.E. 149th St., Brush Prairie. Learn how to create lush, easy-care gardens in practically any location without hours of back-breaking digging or soil-breaking tilling.• Green cleaning: 6-8 p.m. June 8, Clark County Operations Center, 4700 N.E. 78th St. Learn how to make versatile green household cleaners. Free kits and ingredients provided.• Wormshop: 6-8 p.m. June 13, 78th Street Heritage Farm, 1919 N.E. 78th St. Receive a free bin, worms, information and resources, and learn how to build and maintain a worm bin.To register, visit www.clarkgreenneighbors.org/mcr/classes-and-workshops.last_img read more