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Last time they played: Brand, Battier lead Blue Devils past Orangemen in Sweet 16

first_img Published on January 31, 2014 at 4:06 am Facebook Twitter Google+ Duke 80, Syracuse 67, March 21, 1998No. 5-seed Syracuse had a chance to upset No. 1-seed Duke and advance to the Elite Eight. 
The score was tied at 49 with 12:21 to go. SU was hanging around despite being the clear underdog. Duke’s roster was loaded with talented players Elton Brand, Shane Battier and Trajan Langdon. Syracuse had Jason Hart, Etan Thomas and Marius Janulis, but was outmatched on paper.The Orangemen didn’t let the difficult matchup faze them, and they nearly shocked the world. Duke (32-3) held SU off, though, beating Syracuse (26-9), 80-67, in front of 40,589 at Tropicana Field. Brand finished with 20 points and 14 rebounds, Battier added 14 and seven, and Mike Krzyzewski’s Blue Devils used an 11-0 spurt to pull away in the second half. Duke’s offense averaged 85.1 points per game on the season, which was good for sixth in the country. But on Saturday, its defense was just as good. SU shot just 38.1 percent from the field and 61.9 percent from the line, struggling to generate any consistency against Duke’s aggressive defense. Syracuse finished with 16 turnovers, as the Blue Devils’ defense proved stymying when it mattered most.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFor seven-and-a-half minutes, Syracuse was silenced. A 49-49 game quickly transformed into a 60-49 cushion for Duke. The game was nearly even the rest of the way, but it didn’t matter. Duke was going to the Elite Eight and the Orangemen were going home. Duke scored 40 points in both halves. Its consistent offensive output, coupled with steady defense, propelled it past SU. The Blue Devils pulled away thanks in part to a breakaway dunk by Chris Carrawell, who scored 10 points. Battier stole the ball and threw it up ahead to Carrawell, who flushed it home.William Avery hit a 3, which upped Duke’s lead during its pivotal run. Krzyzewski said Avery was crucial during the stretch and he helped Duke pull away. Duke burst out to a 14-5 lead at the start of the game, looking every bit the part of a No. 1 seed. SU had trouble converting around the basket, while the Blue Devils hit shots from all angles.The Orangemen embarked on a mini spurt, but Duke ensured SU never seized the lead. A 28-16 Duke advantage turned into a 28-24 game, thanks to an 8-0 run by SU. But the Blue Devils closed the half on a 12-6 tear to bump the lead back to double digits. Duke outrebounded SU by 11 and racked up more assists and blocks than the Orangemen. It was the kind of complete game necessary in the NCAA Tournament, and Duke’s superb all-around performance paved the way to victory.Jim Boeheim’s team couldn’t slow down the high-octane offense of Krzyzewski’s crew.Brand, who was the first pick in the 1999 NBA Draft the following year, was the best player on the floor. He dominated inside, hitting 10-of-14 field goals in 29 minutes. The Blue Devils fell to Kentucky, 86-84 in the next round, failing to advance to the Final Four. – compiled by Trevor Hass, asst. sports editor, tbhass@syr.edu, @TrevorHass Commentslast_img read more

Syracuse’s goal to be a ‘power-four team’ falls short in NCAA quarterfinals to Northwestern

first_img Published on May 18, 2019 at 6:44 pm Contact KJ: kjedelma@syr.edu | @KJEdelman EVANSTON, IL. —  In the midst of trying to calm down the tears of his players after losing to then-No. 1 Boston College in February, Syracuse head coach Gary Gait paused during his press conference. His team had squandered a five-goal lead. As the No. 11 team in the nation, he wanted to outline his one and only intention for 2019.“We want to be a power-four team that competes for championships,” he declared.There wasn’t much validity to that statement then — only the team’s history as a perennial power. Coming off its worst record in program history, the Orange had to slowly prove themselves. A come-from-behind defeat of then-No. 4 Northwestern, a blow out of then-No. 7 Virginia, taking Maryland, then BC again to the final seconds.After rising to the No. 5 seed in the NCAA tournament, Syracuse (16-5, 5-2 Atlantic Coast) was one win away from making Gait’s wish come to fruition. Northwestern (16-4, 5-1 Big Ten) was the only team standing in the way from Syracuse reaching the final four team for the first time since 2016. With one minute left in the first half, the Orange were on the wrong side of a blowout, down 10-3. A two-hour lightning delay couldn’t save them. Their star attacks, Emily Hawryschuk and Megan Carney, and their nine goals couldn’t either, as the Orange lost 18-14. Syracuse’s season ended because it couldn’t recover from the mess it created in the first half, and Gait’s aspiration fell one game short from coming true.“We just spotted them,” Gait said postgame. “A 10-3 lead is tough to come back from and we didn’t stop the run when we needed to.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textCorey Henry | Photo EditorSyracuse’s first statement win of the season came in late February against the same team that ended its season. Coming off the Boston College collapse, SU stormed the aspects of lacrosse that limited it today: face-guards, a plethora of scorers and a draw control group that ranks top-10 in the nation. Down two in the final minutes in the Carrier Dome, SU fought back to tie the score in the closing seconds. And in overtime, Hawryschuk brought the Orange the alluded ranked win it needed early in the season. But that was February.On May 18, Syracuse had proven it was a top-five — not top-four — team that could take any powerhouse to the final possession. In the first half, the Orange looked far from it.After Hawryschuk had broken out of a face-guard from Northwestern defender Nell Copeland off a spin dodge, Saturday’s matchup seemed to be another “game of runs,” the term Gait alludes to as the nature of lacrosse. With Wildcat attack Selena Lasota, one of five Tewaaraton Award finalists, being shut out, Syracuse was bound to break through. But the Wildcats’ secondary scorers showed up when SU’s couldn’t. Senior Claire Quinn found space to shoot, catching goalkeeper Asa Goldstock off guard. Later, a rip off a double team from NU freshman Izzy Scane befuddled Goldstock as she sat in front of her net.“We wanted to move the ball and attack them aggressively,” Northwestern head coach Kelly Amonte Hiller said. “We were ready…our offense is effective no matter what it’s in front.”Syracuse’s response was turnovers, not scores. Goldstock had no answer and Hawryschuk wasn’t able to score in bunches early like she’s done throughout the year. The one-goal deficit escalated to seven. The Orange were stifled, their hopes of advancing to the final four darkened like the cloudy skies of Evanston.Lasota and Hawryschuk, the top players on their respective teams, resurrected to start the first three minutes of the second half. But lightning struck above Evanston, and any chance of recovery from Syracuse’s first half strife would have to wait two hours.  Corey Henry | Photo EditorCrammed in a small locker room, Gait tried to rally his team as the rain pelted Martin Stadium. Syracuse had just won in a rainstorm a week prior, and the Orange had 27 minutes to erase the 11-6 deficit.The rain steadied, but by 4:45 p.m. Central Standard Time, Hawryschuk lined up for a draw. An SU goal on the first possession was overshadowed by three straight from Northwestern as fog caused by the adjacent Lake Michigan crept in. But in an instant, down 14-8, all of the “wacky” weather disappeared. And SU’s high-octane attack reappeared.“You start on the wrong foot,” freshman Megan Carney said. “And you want to turn that around.”Junior Ella Simkins and freshman Sarah Cooper collided toward the middle, hindering cutters from getting their stick up. And when someone got through, their swipes — which were mostly called fouls earlier — became forced turnovers. Carney scored off a cut, then Hawryschuk bulldozed in. Freshman Meaghan Tyrrell faked a handoff and sidearmed a shot to the opposite side of the net. The scoring run that never came in the first half finally arrived and Northwestern’s lead was just 15-13. “You can see in the second half, we had that intensity,” Hawryschuk said. “We needed more, and we didn’t have that then.”But all of its momentum was stopped on the draw as Hawryschuk, who had 10 draw controls on the day along with five goals, couldn’t maintain her success. NU junior Megan Kinna popped out of nowhere to score, and on the ensuing draw, attack Lindsey McKone scored eight seconds into the shot clock. “The team who wins deserves a final four,” Lasota said. “Every team here has a similar chance, it’s a matter who shows up.”As the clock ticked with Syracuse down four scores with four minutes left, any hope of a comeback slowly became an afterthought. Off a high shot from Lasota with 1:45 left, the clock didn’t stop. Syracuse players, parents, and even head coach Gary Gait couldn’t maintain their cool. While the referees huddled, complaints from a dwindling group of 20 SU parents and fans continued. One Northwestern fan, decking a purple flag, motioned toward them and turned to his friend.“It doesn’t even matter anymore,” the fan said under his breath.Minutes after the game, SU players approached their families one-by-one. Senior Julie Cross, then Hawryschuk and sophomore Sam Swart, with tears in their eyes, tried to embrace the only people left in orange at Martin Field. Gait watched from a distance as his team looked for the comfort he couldn’t give.When asked about falling one game short from being that “power-four team,” Gait put his hands on his Persian blue pants, then tugged at his collar. His eyes widened, but no words came out at first. Eventually, he had to say something. “We were close.”Corey Henry | Photo Editor Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more